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In Search of Gaelic Pride in the Magic City

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    NEWSLETTERS

    Peter Bailey
    Joshua Brown

    In Miami's multicultural potpourri whispers of Gaelic often goes unheard, lost amid Spanish, Creole, Portuguese and the other more popular languages spoken in these parts.

    But late Wednesday evening, a sea of green blanketed South Miami Avenue where Celtic pride reveled outside Brickell Irish Pub as the newly opened dive played host to the city's largest St. Paddy's night street bash.

    "Being the only Irish bar on this side of Brickell in downtown, we wanted to throw a party for the neighborhood," said manager Joshua Brown. "Being that Miami is a party city, St. Paddy's day gives us another reason to have a good time."

    Brown and his green clan kept the Guinness and lager flowing, much to the delight of the ever-growing mob, who by 8 p.m. were slurring the words to the songs spun by several DJs in booths posted outside in grand inebriated St. Paddy's fashion.

    But the raucous bunch, a mix of Brickell professional types and St. Patrick's Day fanatics, managed to sing along with several of the live bands who performed.

    The Bailouts were a crowd favorite.

    "It's just great to see everyone having a good time," said Brown as he shuttled to fill another jug.

    No worries -- he enlisted a special recruit.

    Joked Brown: "I have my one token Irish bartender making the rounds."