Niteside
Shedding light on life after dark

NiteTalk: Artist Rick Falcon Brings Honey, Dirt, Wolves & More to Butter

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    NEWSLETTERS

    Saturday night's Art Walk turned Wynwood into a circus, and Rick Falcon's Butter Gallery solo exhibit was a sideshow all its own. Honey and dirt, wolves and more wolves, animi and archetypes, all colliding beneath strokes of neo-classicist beauty. Niteside went to take a look

    Why the title "Living to Die, Dying to Live"? The title of the show translates the overall concept of the work series. It represents how the universe functions metaphysically. To understand that energy is neither created nor destroyed, and what this understanding of existence allows. It is a self-individuation process, recognizing that everything is inner-connected through the universe in cosmic threads, while maintaining your material embodiment. It also relates to how I would like to live forever -- which is possible -- but from a biological standpoint.

    You seem to have gone to a darker place with this show, especially with the paintings. Care to elaborate? My intentions are to allow certain lifestyles, thoughts and cultural values to die, in order to rebirth a new way of living. To have this illuminating free approach towards life, I had to let go, put to death all aspects of my life, including the way I used to paint, to understand how to embrace a universal existence.
     
    You've also added some installation pieces. What are they all about? The shovel piece is called "Prima material." It refers to how we all have some personal digging to do within ourselves to unearth a self-betterment.
     
    And those mad spinning works in the front room? The spinning piece is titled "Revolution." It's a play on the double-meaning of how all things are revolving -- an inner revolution I hope to create within the viewer. By never ceasing to rotate, it also reiterates the concept of infinity.
     
    This is your second show at Butter. What does curator  Paco de la Torre have that keeps you happily stabled-up in his gallery? Paco is extremely facilitating with almost anything I can think of, and it helps me in my creative process. I feel safe in his gallery. He represents my work passionately and seriously, has keen curatorial ideas for the future, and I know he stands behind me 100 percent.

    When you're not hard at work, where in town do you dig hanging out? I really enjoy a night out with close friends, a bottle of wine, and some good food, either hanging at Joey's in Wynwood, or in the Design District at Michael's.