Insurance Co. Counters Kanye West's $10M Tour Cancellation Suit - NBC 6 South Florida

Insurance Co. Counters Kanye West's $10M Tour Cancellation Suit

The move comes after Kanye West filed suit against the company for refusing to pay claims from the tour cancellation

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    Insurance Co. Counters Kanye West's $10M Tour Cancellation Suit
    Kevork Djansezian/Getty Images, File
    This Aug. 30, 2015, file photo shows Kanye West in Los Angeles, California.

    Lloyd's of London insurance company has countersued Kanye West, insinuating the rapper's use of marijuana precipitated a reported mental health crisis that resulted in the cancellation of a portion of his winter tour, according to court papers obtained Wednesday.

    West sued Lloyd's for $10 million earlier this month in Los Angeles federal court for allegedly refusing to pay out claims stemming from the cancellation.

    Lloyd's doesn't specifically argue in its countersuit that West was using drugs or alcohol, but contends some unspecified behavior activated the policy exclusions that refer to using substances and pre-existing psychological conditions.

    The cancellation was "not beyond (his) control," according to the document, filed this week.

    According to West's lawsuit, the rapper filed a claim with Lloyd's shortly after canceling the second leg of the "Saint Pablo" tour and checking himself into UCLA Medical Center in November.

    Lawyers for West allege the entertainer and his company Very Good Touring Inc. have not been paid, and the insurance giant is intentionally stalling.

    "Nor have they provided anything approaching a coherent explanation about why they have not paid, or any indication if they will ever pay or even make a coverage decision, implying that Kanye's use of marijuana may provide them with a basis to deny the claim and retain the hundreds of thousands of dollars in insurance premiums paid by Very Good," according to the initial complaint.

    "The stalling is emblematic of a broader modus operandi of the insurers of never-ending post-claim underwriting where the insurers hunt for some contrived excuse not to pay," the suit alleges.

    West originally planned to perform 38 dates between Aug. 12 and Nov. 2, and took out insurance in case cancellations were needed, his lawsuit states.