7 Hospitalized for Carbon Monoxide Poisoning in Hollywood

By Julia Bagg and Brian Hamacher
|  Monday, Jan 6, 2014  |  Updated 5:55 PM EDT
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Seven people – including three children – were transported to a hospital after they suffered carbon monoxide poisoning at a home in Hollywood Monday morning, officials said. The victims were later released from Memorial Regional Hospital and are expected to be okay. NBC 6’s Christina Hernandez reports.

Seven people – including three children – were transported to a hospital after they suffered carbon monoxide poisoning at a home in Hollywood Monday morning, officials said. The victims were later released from Memorial Regional Hospital and are expected to be okay. NBC 6’s Christina Hernandez reports.

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7 Hospitalized With Carbon Monoxide Poisoning in Hollywood

Seven people were hospitalized with carbon monoxide poisoning in Hollywood. Chief Joel Medina and neighbor Stacy Williams comment.
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Seven people – including three children – were transported to a hospital after they suffered carbon monoxide poisoning at a home in Hollywood Monday morning, officials said.

The victims were later released from Memorial Regional Hospital and are expected to be okay.

They were taken to the hospital around 6 a.m. after complaining of carbon monoxide poisoning symptoms at a home on the 1900 block of Thomas Street, Hollywood Fire Rescue officials said.


Some family pets were also taken out of the building.

Inspectors responded to the scene and determined the carbon monoxide was coming from a tankless water heater system.

"I think that it's terrible, especially with the kids being in the house and everything and being more importantly so close next door," neighbor Stacy Williams said.

Fire rescue workers had been at the home on Saturday and Sunday, taking people to the hospital both times, officials said. But it was unknown if those incidents were also related to carbon monoxide poisoning.

Firefighters said the high levels of carbon monoxide could have killed someone, and they stressed the importance of using carbon monoxide detectors, especially when using fuel-based heaters.

"The thing with carbon monoxide is it’s odorless, it’s colorless, and it can kill,” said Broward Sheriff Fire Rescue spokesman Mike Jachles.

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