South Floridians Still Want to Lose Weight Despite AMA's Overweight Study

AMA findings show being overweight lowers risk of death

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    NEWSLETTERS

    South Floridians may be looking to burn off extra holiday calories in the new year but a new study from the American Medical Association is already making them feel better. The AMA study, released Tuesday, shows that being overweight lowers the risk of death. Dr. Katherine Flegal, Valerie Weaver, Gwen Miller and Lili Neale discuss. (Published Tuesday, Jan 1, 2013)

    South Floridians may be looking to burn off extra holiday calories in the new year but a new study from the American Medical Association is already making them feel better.

    The AMA study, released Tuesday, shows that being overweight lowers the risk of death. CDC researchers analyzed nearly 100 studies from the US and around the world dealing with body mass index and death rates.

    "There were almost three million people in all these studies and over 270,000 deaths," CDC researcher Dr. Katherine Flegal said.

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    Those with a BMI in the overweight category fared better than those in the normal weight category.

    "Sometimes that surprises people but they really should not be too surprised because in our categories of 97 studies, 80 percent of them showed that there was lower mortality in overweight than in normal weight people," Flegal said.

    That doesn't apply if your BMI is in the obese category.

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    At Kennedy Park in Coconut Creek Tuesday, South Floridians said they'll keep trying to slim down and stick to their New Year's resolutions.

    "Obviously it's to get fit, same one I had last year," Valerie Weaver said of her resolution. " But I'm determined to do it this year."

    "To age with grace, that's my New Year's resolution," Gwen Miller said.

    "Well, just keep the weight I'm at, try not to pack on the pounds," Lili Neale said.

    Click here to find out your BMI