Everything you need to know for the 2014 hurricane season

Unusually Quiet 2013 Atlantic Hurricane Season Ends

The 2013 Atlantic hurricane season ended with 13 named storms, only two of which became hurricanes -- Ingrid and Humberto.

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    NEWSLETTERS

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    Saturday marked the end of an unusually quiet hurricane season.

    The 2013 Atlantic hurricane season ended with 13 named storms, only two of which became hurricanes -- Ingrid and Humberto. It was originally predicted to be above average with 13 to 20 named storms and three to six major hurricanes.

    The season held the fewest number of hurricanes in a season since 1982, according to the Florida Division of Emergency Management. It was the sixth least active hurricane season since 1950 in terms of collective strength and duration of named storms and hurricanes, and there were no major hurricanes in the Atlantic Basin this year, which hasn't happened since 1994, FDEM said.

    Only two storms impacted Florida in 2013. Tropical Storm Andrea made landfall on June 6 and produced floods and tornadoes. Remnants of Tropical Storm Karen crossed northern Florida on Oct. 6.

    The low hurricane activity was caused by an unpredictable atmospheric pattern that produced more wind shear over the Atlantic Basin than what was expected, according to FDEM. That, combined with dry air conditions caused by Saharan dust, prevented the storms from becoming very strong. Other storm system along the U.S. eastern seaboard also helped keep the storms from reaching landfall, FDEM said.

    Despite the inactive hurricane season, emergency management officials urge Florida residents to remain prepared for all types of disasters as drier conditions move over the state, enhancing wildfire potential.

    For more on emergency preparedness, click here.

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