Child Drowning Spotlights Pool Safety for Labor Day

The drowning of a baby in Tamarac Saturday and a near-drowning in Fort Lauderdale emphasize the importance of pool safety

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    NEWSLETTERS

    A toddler drowns in Tamarac and another child nearly loses his life in the water in Fort Lauderdale Saturday. These tragic cases are reminders to parents to never lose sight of their children, not even for a second this Labor Day Weekend. Broward County Sheriff's spokeswoman Dani Moschella described the drowning of the 23-month-old baby. (Published Monday, Sep 3, 2012)

    A toddler drowns in Tamarac and another child nearly loses his life in the water in Fort Lauderdale Saturday.

    These tragic cases are reminders to parents to never lose sight of their children, not even for a second this Labor Day Weekend.

    A 23-month-old baby quietly sank to the bottom of the pool at a friend's Tamarac home on the 7900 block of 71st Avenue Saturday.

    "This is just a tragic accident," said Broward County Sheriff's spokesperson Dani Moschella. "His parents were within feet of him, sitting on lawn chairs talking. The baby was playing in the pool and unfortunately nobody noticed him slip under the water where he was for presumably a few minutes."

    The drowning happened quickly, there were no splashes of water or screams from the child to alert parents.

    "This is something that can happen to any of us, it can happen to any family if you're not watching your child every moment," Moschella

    Over in Fort Lauderdale, a 5-year-old boy nearly drowned in a backyard pool. Fire Rescue performed CPR and rushed the child from the east campus circle home in critical condition to Broward general medical center.

    Drowning is the fifth leading cause of unintentional death in the US, according to the CDC.

    Keep these safety tips in mind as you celebrate being poolside this Labor Day.

    • Put up barriers to prevent children from falling into pools.
    • Keep a close eye on kids.
    • Be close enough to reach a child at all times.
    • Don't be distracted by phone calls, text messages, or talking with others.
    • Learn to swim.
    • Learn CPR. Seconds count, the more quickly CPR is started, the better the chances of survival.