Community Protests Reopening of Controversial Quick Stop

Demonstration at scene of alleged racial beating

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    NEWSLETTERS

    NBCMiami.com
    Protestors gather at the Quick Stop in Southwest Miami-Dade on Nov. 29, 2010.

    Angry members of a South Florida community were out bright and early to protest the reopening of a Southwest Miami-Dade convenience store where a man was killed earlier this month in what some are calling a racially-motivated attack.

    Dozens of protesters waving signs reading "Boycott the Store" and "Justice & Change" descended on the Quick Stop on Southwest 168th St. Monday morning to hold a peace rally following the death of 34-year-old Akil LaRue Oliver on Nov. 18.

    Store owners Ragheb Sulaiman, 24, and brother Nabil Sulaiman, 19, have both been arrested in Oliver's death. Police said Oliver got into a shouting match with store employees, allegedly shouting racial slurs at the Sulaimans in an argument over seven cents.

    Community Protests Outside Scene of Quick Shop Murder

    [MI] Community Protests Outside Scene of Quick Shop Murder
    Supporters of a man killed during an argument at a convenience store took to the streets of Southwest Miami-Dade to demand harsher charges for those allegedly responsible.

    Police said one of the brothers, Nabil Sulaiman, hit Oliver over the head with a bottle and then Ragheb hit him over the head with a crowbar.

    Family members claim the pair used racial slurs as they beat Oliver.

    "After he was dead, they continued to beat him and they were calling him the N word. They were calling him a ni--er while they were beating him and something has to be done about that," said Bernard Hudson, Oliver's brother.

    Ragheb Sulaiman has been charged with second-degree murder. Nabil Sulaiman has been charged with battery and is out of jail on a $10,000 bond.

    The store has remained closed during the investigation, but was set to open Monday. Several protesters had descended on the Quick Stop earlier this month for a demonstration.

    "It's so sad that it took for what happened to my brother to happen for us to come together like this," said Hudson.