Delray Beach Police Facing Lawsuit for Alleged Excessive Force - NBC 6 South Florida

Delray Beach Police Facing Lawsuit for Alleged Excessive Force

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    NEWSLETTERS

    A video involving Delray Beach Police surfaced on social media and the department is facing a brutality accusation lawsuit. (Published Monday, Sept. 14, 2015)

    New details have been released surrounding a case of what some called excessive force by the Delray Beach Police Department.

    The man who originally posted the video of the incident, said he wasn't faulting the police, he was just asking for opinions.

    But after threats and criticism to the Delray Beach Police Department, he deleted the post. Now, the suspect in the case has gotten a lawyer and the police department is facing a lawsuit.

    Photos show the wounds inflicted by a Delray Beach Police K-9 on Mason Courson while he was being arrested for intoxication, assault on an officer and drug charges.

    Courson's attorney claims those photos verify Delray Police are lying.

    Video surfaced on social media that sparked the controversy.

    The Delray's Police chief backs his officers, saying Courson refused to give up his hands. They were underneath him. Hidden hands pose a threat to officers, so they released the dog.

    "These two photos together show there's no way that Mason could be having his hands underneath him at the time the dog bit him," said Attorney Gary Kollin.

    Kollin claims Courson's hands were actually behind his back, as police ordered, and the 60 seconds of video verifies police are full of it.

    He calls attention to the audio, "You will hear the ratcheting of handcuffs on two occasions. One for each arm. The ratcheting of handcuffs happen before the dog is released."

    The chief told NBC 6 last week this is a case of a belligerent, combative suspect, who simply wouldn't follow commands.

    "They weren't able to handcuff him, his hands were underneath his body. I can tell you those aren't good situations for officers when hands are not seen. The guy had already punched an officer, they've asked him to remove his hands from his body, he didn't do it," Chief Jeff Goldman said.

    The chief said he supports his officers' actions, and the use of the K-9 officer is an appropriate option.

    The police also accused Courson of being on flakka. Courson's attorney said that is false. In fact, no blood or urine tests were performed at the hospital.

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