Drivers Flashing High Beams To Warn Others of Speed Traps Will No Longer Be Against Florida Law Jan. 1

Maria Vazquez says the new law evens the playing field for drivers

By Jawan Strader
|  Tuesday, Jan 1, 2013  |  Updated 9:35 AM EDT
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Drivers trying to look out for other drivers by flashing their high beams to alert them of speed traps will no longer being breaking the law in the state of Florida. Driver Maria Vazquez comments.

Drivers trying to look out for other drivers by flashing their high beams to alert them of speed traps will no longer being breaking the law in the state of Florida. Driver Maria Vazquez comments.

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Drivers trying to look out for other drivers by flashing their high beams to alert them of speed traps will no longer being breaking the law in the state of Florida.

The Florida Highway Patrol says that since 2005 more than 10,000 drivers got in trouble for flashing their lights. Many drivers had to shell out almost $175 to cover the ticket.

But that will change Jan. 1.

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Maria Vazquez is in favor of the new law, saying she believes it evens the playing field for drivers.

"You're kind of doing a good deed, because you're going to slow down anyways,” she said.

And police will catch plenty of people speeding in any case, Vazquez said.

“Plus they're kind of sneaky, they kind of hide in bushes and behind stop signs, so I think it's fair game,” she said of the new law.

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Fair game to alert oncoming drivers — that will no longer be viewed as obstruction of justice in the Sunshine State.

"I think that's part of being your brother’s keeper right there,” driver Ceyon Morgan said.

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