Local Family Wants Daughter With Epilepsy to Use Marijuana to Curb Seizures

It's not traditional marijuana, which contains THC, the ingredient that makes you high. Charlotte's Web is very low in THC and high in the medicinal component CBD, and it's dispensed in oil form.

By Diana Gonzalez
|  Monday, Jan 6, 2014  |  Updated 7:23 PM EDT
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Rebecca Hyman was born with a genetic disorder and began having seizures four years ago. Now her parents want her to use a special strain of marijuana as an alternative medication, but her father says if he brings it into Florida he will be considered a criminal. NBC 6’s Diana Gonzalez reports.

Rebecca Hyman was born with a genetic disorder and began having seizures four years ago. Now her parents want her to use a special strain of marijuana as an alternative medication, but her father says if he brings it into Florida he will be considered a criminal. NBC 6’s Diana Gonzalez reports.

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Rebecca Hyman was born with a genetic disorder and began having seizures four years ago.

Her parents took video of the 8-year-old having a seizure Sunday to show that traditional medications aren't working well. So they've been researching other alternatives.

"And that's what led me to medical marijuana. I saw it work. I spoke to families in other states where it's legal. I see how effective it has been and there's no reason why children, adults, anyone in the state of Florida who has seizures, why should they suffer?" said Seth Hyman, her father.

The Hymans heard the story of Charlotte Figi who was having dozens of seizures a day. A special strain of marijuana was developed for her which has reduced her seizures by 99 percent.

It's not traditional marijuana, which contains THC, the ingredient that makes you high. Charlotte's Web is very low in THC and high in the medicinal component CBD, and it's dispensed in oil form.

Hyman added that if he brings it into Florida he will be considered a criminal.

"So as a parent knowing that there is something out there that could help your child or you believe it could help, we don't know until we try," he said.

His daughter's case and others in Florida have prompted two state legislators to hold a workshop on Thursday to try to come up with a solution.

"Building upon the body of research that's already there and yet to come, how can we provide patients with access to a cannabis-derived pill or oil in the most safe and effective way?" is the question that State Rep Katie Edwards, D-Plantation, is hoping will be answered.

The Hyman family will be speaking at the workshop in Tallahassee. Other parents, growers and doctors will also share their stories.

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