Man Killed by Train in Pompano Beach: Broward Sheriff's Office

Red lights were flashing and the gates were down when he was struck, the BSO said

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    NEWSLETTERS

    A 31-year-old man was struck and killed by a train in Pompano Beach Saturday night. BSO spokeswoman Dani Moschella talked about how trains are unable to stop, even when people or cars are in their way.

    A 31-year-old man was struck and killed by a train in Pompano Beach Saturday night, the Broward Sheriff’s Office said.

    The BSO identified him on Sunday as Matthew Sayers of Pompano Beach.

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    German Hueso faces charges of driving under the influence, driving without a license, leaving the scene of an accident and child endangerment for the Monday crash. In court on Tuesday, Broward Circuit Judge John Hurley told Hueso that his blood alcohol level had been .208. Neighbor Alicia Honor said it was a miracle that there were no serious injuries from the crash.

    The accident happened near the intersection of NE 48th Street and Dixie Highway just after 7 p.m. Saturday when the pedestrian walked into the path of a Florida East Cosat Railways cargo train, according to the BSO.

    At the time red lights were flashing and the gates indicating a train was crossing were down, the BSO said.

    "The train engineer saw him and beeped the horn. He appeared distracted. We don't know why at this point," BSO spokeswoman Dani Moschella said.

    "He just walked right around the gate and into the path of the oncoming train," she added.

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    The BSO said it continues to investigate but believes Sayers' death was accidental.

    "Unfortunately whenever a train engineer sees someone on the tracks it can't stop. Trains are not capable of stopping abruptly and that's why it's so important to recognize those gates, to never try to get around the gates, whether you’re walking or in a car," Moschella said.

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