Nine Foot American Crocodile is Common Sight At NOAA on Virginia Key

Darwin is the name the NOAA employees gave the croc, who comes by for a nice drink of water.

By Jennifer Reeves
|  Thursday, Feb 28, 2013  |  Updated 10:23 PM EDT
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The crocodile comes to get water during the dry months, said biologist Tom Jackson. Jennifer Reeves reports.

The crocodile comes to get water during the dry months, said biologist Tom Jackson. Jennifer Reeves reports.

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It may not be what most people see outside their office windows, but a jaw-dropping 9-foot American crocodile is a common sight for the folks at NOAA on Virginia Key.

"Everybody who has a window on that side of the pond will keep a look out every once in a while. Send a note to the building, "Hey, Darwin is in the pond," said Erica Rule, a NOAA employee.

Darwin is the name the NOAA employees gave the croc, who comes by for a nice drink of water.

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"Especially when we have our dry season, they are looking for fresh water, soo if they hear a dripping pipe, they will assume that's a place to go drink," says biologist Tom Jackson

"So after a small rain.'Pop' You hear a drip.You hear that from a very long distance..They go over and look for water,"  Jackson said.

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Jackson said they aren't aggressive or a danger to the employees, but just in case, a fence was put up for extra protection.

But NOAA employees are happy the crocs are there and hope they stay.

"It's fantastic that the offices are happy they are here.They are Florida. They are more Floridian than we are," said Jackson.

Employees have spotted four to six crocodiles over the years.

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