No Jail for Miami-Dade Crime Stoppers Head in Tip-Eating Incident

Probation given to Crime Stoppers director for eating tip in court

By Julia Bagg and Brian Hamacher
|  Thursday, Mar 20, 2014  |  Updated 12:23 PM EDT
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Miami-Dade Crime Stoppers Director Richard Masten won't go to jail after a judge gave him probation Thursday for stuffing an anonymous tip in his mouth in court. Judge Victoria Brennan also ordered Masten to write a memorandum saying he understands the law about anonymous tips.

Miami-Dade Crime Stoppers Director Richard Masten won't go to jail after a judge gave him probation Thursday for stuffing an anonymous tip in his mouth in court. Judge Victoria Brennan also ordered Masten to write a memorandum saying he understands the law about anonymous tips.

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Crime Stoppers Head Speaks About Eating Tip

The executive director of Miami-Dade Crime Stoppers is facing up to two weeks behind bars on a contempt of court charge after he ate a tip. NBC 6's Gilma Avalos spoke with Richard Masten about the bold move.

A Look At How Crime Stoppers Works

Miami-Dade and Broward Crime Stoppers get hundreds of calls each month. Miami-Dade Crime Stoppers' executive director, Richard Masten, and BCSO Commander Michael Calderin explained how it works.
More Photos and Videos

Miami-Dade Crime Stoppers Director Richard Masten won't go to jail after a judge gave him probation Thursday for stuffing an anonymous tip in his mouth in court.

Judge Victoria Brennan also ordered Masten to write a memorandum saying he understands the law about anonymous tips.

"I'll go dust off the books and I'll write my essay," Masten said after Thursday's hearing. "I have a clear understanding of the law."


Masten made national headlines after he was given a contempt of court charge for eating the tip related to a cocaine possession case. Instead, he stuffed the paper containing the tip into his mouth while sitting in court.

He had been facing up to two weeks in jail for the act, but Brennan said it wasn't necessary.

"To put him in jail for 14 days isn't gonna educate him," she said, while describing his "contemptuous behavior" as "aggravated."

Masten said he had been prepared to go to jail Thursday, and had even packed a toothbrush just in case.

Masten's probation will end after he reads the memorandum before the judge during his next court date, scheduled for April 14.

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