Filmmaker Introduces World to "Oscar's Cuba" | NBC 6 South Florida

Filmmaker Introduces World to "Oscar's Cuba"

Miami film debuts on May 18 at Little Havana's Tower Theater

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    Filmmaker Introduces World to "Oscar's Cuba"

    Jordan Allott did not know much about Cuba and the dissident movement on the island. He also realized that the rest of the world outside of South Florida knew little about the lack of democracy and the abuse of human rights Cubans endure daily.

    Few if any had heard of Dr. Oscar Biscet

    "I thought if there was not a documentary about him already there has got to be one made," Allot said.

    Allott's documentary film, "Oscar's Cuba," debuts for for the general public May 18. The setting, Little Havana's Tower Theater.

    Dr. Oscar Biscet is described as "Cuba's forgotten hero." Allott had never heard of Biscet until a Catholic priest friend had alerted the film producer to the Cuban dissident movement. He quickly realized that the Biscet story was powerful.

    Biscet was a young doctor with a promising career takes on the Fidel Castro government. He protested the rampant abortions encouraged by the regime. He was vocal about civil rights, human rights, the ability to speak freely, and to assemble.

    None of this went down well for the doctor, who was praised by fellow dissidents, admired by Cuban Exiles,and honored by with U.S. Presidential Medal of Freedom.

    Biscet is now serving a 25-year sentence for disorderly conduct and counter-revolutionary activities.

    "I think the biggest point is to proclaim to the world that some one is put in jail just for thinking and for defending human rights," said Dr. Ismael Roque-Velesco, who is a board member of The Lawton Foundation.

    Biscet begin the Lawton Foundation as a platform for his human rights activities. Local Miami doctors like Roque-Velesco are members of the Havana-based group which still functions absent their leader.

    But "Oscar's Cuba" is not just for those born on the island or to Cuban parents.

    "I really want to focus on getting out to non-Cubans," Allott said.

    And that is a tall order where in the U.S., Fidel Castro is regarded as a harmless cold war relic and Che Guevara is a universal symbol of youthful rebellion.

    "I think it is a new time. I think there is opportunity for us to educate the non-Cuban population."

    To learn more about the film and showings, go to the Oscar's Cuba website.