Rainy Weather Brings Toads And Mosquitoes

Miami-Dade's Mosquito Control Division is preparing to start spraying almost a month ahead of schedule

By Diana Gonzalez
|  Thursday, May 24, 2012  |  Updated 11:26 PM EDT
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Many may find the sound of the rain soothing, but some may not know what else the rain brings. Chalmers Vasquez, of the Miami-Dade Mosquito Control, talks about the changes caused by the rain.

Many may find the sound of the rain soothing, but some may not know what else the rain brings. Chalmers Vasquez, of the Miami-Dade Mosquito Control, talks about the changes caused by the rain.

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Many may find the sound of the rain soothing, but some may not know what else the rain brings.

Bufo toads, which are very dangerous to dogs, come out during rainy weather and camouflage in leaves. NBC 6 reporter Diana Gonzalez spotted several of the toads outside Thursday.

“They secrete this through the glands of the skin, this toxin, very venomous toxin,” said vet Richard Rogoff of the Kendall Animal Clinic.

Rogoff treated a Golden Retriever this weekend at his facility.

“The mucous membranes were bright red and extreme salivation, and the dog was beginning to be on its side beginning to almost seizure, so that was the signs of Bufo toxicity,” he said.

The mosquito, another rain-loving menace, is causing problems.

Miami-Dade's Mosquito Control Division is preparing to start spraying almost a month ahead of schedule.

“Most of the breeding grounds are flooded now,” said Chalmers Vasquez of the Miami-Dade Mosquito Control. “It takes about five to seven days to complete the cycle. We think they'll be flying and on people by next week.”

The species that cause illnesses like the West Nile Virus and Dengue can breed in backyard containers with standing water. Experts say dumping out the water after rainfall is a good idea.
 

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