Southwest Broward County Sprayed For Mosquitoes

Residents can request mosquito spraying online or by telephone

By Julia Bagg and Lisa Orkin Emmanuel
|  Monday, Jun 4, 2012  |  Updated 7:31 PM EDT
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The southwest part of Broward County was sprayed for mosquitoes on Monday. The area, sprayed between 4 a.m. and 6:30 a.m., included Pembroke Pines and Southwest Ranches in the quadrant from Griffin Road to the north, Pines Boulevard to the south, Interstate 75 to the east and U.S. Highway 27 to the west. Minnie Prieto talks about the pests.

The southwest part of Broward County was sprayed for mosquitoes on Monday. The area, sprayed between 4 a.m. and 6:30 a.m., included Pembroke Pines and Southwest Ranches in the quadrant from Griffin Road to the north, Pines Boulevard to the south, Interstate 75 to the east and U.S. Highway 27 to the west. Minnie Prieto talks about the pests.

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The southwest part of Broward County was sprayed for mosquitoes on Monday.

The area, sprayed between 4 a.m. and 6:30 a.m., included Pembroke Pines and Southwest Ranches in the quadrant from Griffin Road to the north, Pines Boulevard to the south, Interstate 75 to the east and U.S. Highway 27 to the west.

The county's mosquito control section will spray areas using either a truck or plane based on residents' requests. During spraying, residents with breathing problems are urged to stay inside, and people who are registered with the state to be alerted have been told of the spraying.

To request a spraying visit broward.org or call 954-765-4062.  In Miami-Dade call 311 for mosquito control help.

"They're terrible," said Minnie Prieto, wearing long sleeves as she trimmed thick green blades of grass in her front yard off Sterling Road in west Broward.

She's already been bitten a few times over the weekend.

"So far so good," she said about avoiding the insects Monday morning. She's glad county workers are spraying, but doesn't like the smell much.

Mosquito Control Manager Joe Marhefka insists the chemicals are safe, and the county follows EPA standards.

The chemicals dissipate quickly in the morning, he said.

"They don't stay within the environment," he said.

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