Woman Displaced by Partial Roof Collapse Says "Da Vinci Code" Collectible Was Stolen From Apartment

The building manager dismissed the claim, and said every tenant that goes in the building is escorted by a security guard

View Comments (
)
|
Email
|
Print

    NEWSLETTERS

    One of the residents displaced by the recent partial roof collapse at a North Miami building says a valuable “Da Vinci Code” collectible has been stolen from her apartment. NBC 6's Laura Rodriguez reports.

    One of the residents displaced by the recent partial roof collapse at a North Miami building says a valuable “Da Vinci Code” collectible has been stolen from her apartment.

    Mitka Numa said that when she walked into her apartment at the Gold King Apartments at 13285 Northeast 6th Ave. Thursday afternoon, the collectible that cost her thousands of dollars was missing.

    ”We locked the door, but they opened it and they stole our stuff and this is not fair,” she said.

    But when the building manager was asked about the stolen property, he said it’s simply not true.

    Displaced Tenants Hoping to Move Back In

    [MI] Building Owner Hopes to Move Displaced Tenants Back in by Friday Night
    The owner of a North Miami building said he hopes tenants displaced by a partial roof collapse can move back in by Friday night. NBC 6's Christina Hernandez has the story.

    ”Every tenant that go in there, we have the security guard escort them,” building manager Robertaud Toussaint said.

    The partial roof collapse a week ago forced more than 200 residents to evacuate the apartment building. The collapse happened after crews had been working on the building’s roof earlier in the week but hadn’t finished before heavy rain moved into the area last Thursday morning, Dec. 26, according to police.

    Management says the people working in the apartments are also escorted by an office staff member or security.

    County inspectors and air conditioning and elevator workers were on site most of Thursday trying to get the building up to code.

    ”We are doing our best to make sure that those folks get back home,” Toussaint said.

    Ninety percent of the apartments are ready, according to management. The county must give its OK before residents can return.

    Tenants such as Numa just want to move back in after being out of their homes for a week.

    ”I have to live in a hotel and I pay $60 every night,” she said.

    On Thursday Numa's roommate walked out of the building with a safe in his hands. He said some of his shirts were also stolen.

    ”I'm feeling bad,” he said.

    Numa described her feelings this way: ”So bad and so frustrated, especially after I lost my stuff, you understand, this is a collectible, this is a fortune for me.”

    The building owner said that once everything is fixed, he plans to call all of the tenants to let them know that they can move back in.