<![CDATA[NBC 6 South Florida - National & International News]]>Copyright 2016http://www.nbcmiami.com/news/national-international http://media.nbcnewyork.com/designimages/NBC+6+LOGO+GOOGLE.png NBC 6 South Florida http://www.nbcmiami.comen-usTue, 27 Sep 2016 10:05:12 -0400Tue, 27 Sep 2016 10:05:12 -0400NBC Owned Television Stations <![CDATA[Fact-Checking 1st General Election Debate]]> Tue, 27 Sep 2016 09:48:50 -0400 http://media.nbcmiami.com/images/213*120/AP_16271039934629.jpg



Photo Credit: AP
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<![CDATA[Firefighter Dead, 6 Hurt When Suspected Drug Den Explodes]]> Tue, 27 Sep 2016 09:58:58 -0400 http://media.nbcmiami.com/images/213*120/mayors+office+explosion.jpg

A firefighter was killed by falling debris when a suspected drug den exploded in the Bronx Tuesday, leveling a two-story home and injuring at least six other people, according to police and fire officials.  

The identity of the dead firefighter wasn't immediately released, and the extents of the others' injuries weren't clear following the 7:30 a.m. blast at the private home on West 234th Street near Tibbett Avenue in Kingsbridge. About an hour before the explosion, firefighters had responded to a report of a gas smell at the location and found the drug lab, police say. 

 

The NYPD was called in, but the two-story house exploded before officers could assess the lab or the rest of the location, according to police. Streets were shut down in the area as utility crews, firefighters and police cordoned off the site. Video from the scene shows the home completely demolished, the roof in shambles, partially collapsed over one of the building's sides. Piles of debris rained onto the street, covering the road and nearby parked cars. 

One Instagram user said the blast "shook my whole neighborhood," adding it "felt like a bomb went off." Another neighbor said her windows shook. Still another said she felt as if there had been an earthquake.  

A photo taken from the 238th Street subway platform showed a plume of smoke rising into the air. 



Photo Credit: @NYCMayorsOffice
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<![CDATA[Taliban Watches Debate From Secret Afghanistan Location]]> Tue, 27 Sep 2016 08:58:56 -0400 http://media.nbcmiami.com/images/213*120/AP_743351664968.jpg

Taliban leaders were watching last night's debate between Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Clinton and Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump from a secret location in Afghanistan, according to NBC News.

A spokesman for the group, Zabihullah Mujahid, told NBC that they were "very interested in watching," and they had hoped Afghanistan would have been a more prominent part of the debate.

He said that Trump is "non-serious," and said the candidate "[says] anything that comes to his tongue."

"There nothing of interest to us in the debate as both of them said little about Afghanistan and their future plans for the country," Mujahid added.



Photo Credit: AP, File]]>
<![CDATA[Highlights From the 2016 Campaign Trail]]> Tue, 27 Sep 2016 06:45:44 -0400 http://media.nbcmiami.com/images/213*120/AP_16271040053633.jpg The 2016 presidential race has been contentious and full of surprises. Check out scenes from the campaign trail.

Photo Credit: AP]]>
<![CDATA[Trump Didn't Talk Bill Clinton Because Chelsea in the Room]]> Tue, 27 Sep 2016 08:29:25 -0400 http://media.nbcmiami.com/images/213*120/GettyImages-610601852.jpg

Donald Trump told reporters after last night's debate that he held back from talking about former President Bill Clinton's private indiscretions because the former president's daughter Chelsea Clinton was present, NBC News reported.

"I'm very glad that I didn't mention, because Chelsea was in the room, indiscretions by, I didn't think would be appropriate to do even though she's taken all these ads. I thought we did very well," Trump said.

Trump's daughter Ivanka is friends with Chelsea Clinton. 

Trump's running mate Mike Pence said on the "Today" show Tuesday morning that the Republican presidential candidate showed great restraint during the debate after an "avalanche of insults" from Clinton.



Photo Credit: Getty Images]]>
<![CDATA[Marlins Remember Jose Fernandez During Monday's Game]]> Tue, 27 Sep 2016 08:09:27 -0400 http://media.nbcmiami.com/images/182*120/GettyImages-610610562.jpg

Photo Credit: Getty Images]]>
<![CDATA[Top News Photos of the Week]]> Tue, 27 Sep 2016 09:09:18 -0400 http://media.nbcmiami.com/images/180*120/AP_16270585118172.jpg View daily updates on the best photos in domestic and foreign news.

Photo Credit: AP]]>
<![CDATA[Mosque, Conference Center Attacked in Germany ]]> Tue, 27 Sep 2016 07:22:01 -0400 http://media.nbcmiami.com/images/213*120/AP_16271391188671.jpg

Two home-made bombs hit a mosque and a conference center in eastern Germany late Monday in what officials called a "xenophobic" attack, NBC News reported.

No one was injured by the blasts in Dresden, birthplace in 2014 of the anti-Islam PEGIDA movement, whose name is an acronym for Patriotic Europeans Against the Islamisation of the West.

The city's police chief said officials were "now in crisis mode."

"Even though there has been no claim of responsibility, we have to assume that there is a xenophobic motive," Dresden police chief Horst Kretzschmar said in a statement.

A recent government report warned that xenophobia was rising in ex-communist eastern Germany.



Photo Credit: AP]]>
<![CDATA[Marlins to Retire No. 16 in Honor of Jose Fernandez]]> Tue, 27 Sep 2016 07:47:43 -0400 http://media.nbcmiami.com/images/213*120/AP_16270851118909.jpg

No one on the Miami Marlins will ever wear Jose Fernandez’s No. 16 again, owner Jeffrey Loria announced Monday, a day after the star pitcher was killed in a boating accident.

But that will only take effect after Monday night, when Marlins players honored Fernandez by each wearing his jersey number during their game against the Mets, in which he had been scheduled to start.

And second baseman Dee Gordon started the game with an almost unbelievable tribute to his teammate, slamming the third pitch out of the park for a lead-off home run. 

Gordon was overcome as he touched home, hugging his teammates as he walked back to the dugout.

Fernandez and two others were found dead on Sunday morning when the boat they were on, which authorities have said appeared to be traveling very fast, crashed on a jetty off Miami Beach.

That day, the Marlins held an emotional press conference where the players and coaching staff fought back tears remembering the 24-year-old ace. The team also painted his No. 16 on the pitcher's mound and placed flowers alongside the rubber.

Fernandez dazzled on the mound for Miami in his brief career and the team will recognize his achievements in Monday's game.

The Marlins canceled Sunday's game against the Braves following Fernandez's death. Barring a need for that contest in the playoff race, Miami will only play 161 games this season.

The Marlins' gesture to have every player don Fernandez's number is reminiscent of the league's annual remembrance of Jackie Robinson. Every season, every player on every team wears his No. 42 for one day in April.

Fernandez will likely go down in history as the last Marlins player to wear No. 16, besides the players wearing it in his memory. While the team has not announced the plan officially, Monday's gesture points in that direction.

The game Monday night also included a moment of silence.

It's the first time in Marlins history that an active player has died. It is a rare event in sports and one that has no playbook. Miami could opt to hold more tributes for Fernandez next season as well, including at the 2017 All-Star Game.



Photo Credit: Lynne Sladky/AP
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<![CDATA[Clinton vs. Trump Debate: Social Media Reacts]]> Tue, 27 Sep 2016 06:48:50 -0400 http://media.nbcmiami.com/images/213*120/GettyImages-610601290.jpg

The presidential nominees sparred for 99 minutes in their first presidential debate held at Hofstra University Monday night.

Donald Trump and Hillary Clinton tackled the economy, ISIS, taxes and the president's birth status. They also took jabs at one another, and plenty of them.

"I have a feeling by the end of this debate I'm going to be blamed for everything that's ever happened," Clinton joked.

Clinton noted that cyber security attacks were a concern, and the United States should be wary of Russia, and noted that "Donald is very praiseworthy of Vladimir Putin." 

Trump said he'd release his tax returns once Clinton provided the 33,000 emails she deleted, and that his temperment was his best asset. 

"She doesn't have the stamina... I don't believe Hillary has the stamina" to be president, Trump said. 

The top three issues posted to Facebook by 18- to 34 year-olds during the night were ISIS, racism and discrimination and crime and criminal justice, according to Facebook. 

#TrumpSniffles began showing up on Twitter timelines in response to Trump appearing to sniffle throughout the debate. 

Social media users shared a breadth of reaction as Lester Holt of NBC News moderated the debate. 



Photo Credit: Pool/Getty Images
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<![CDATA[Labor Dept. Sues Tech Firm ]]> Tue, 27 Sep 2016 07:23:03 -0400 http://media.nbcmiami.com/images/213*120/karp.jpg

The U.S. Department of Labor has filed a lawsuit accusing a high-flying Silicon Valley software company of systematically discriminating against Asian job applicants over the last five years.

Palantir Technologies was co-founded by prominent tech financier Peter Thiel, with backing from an investment arm of the CIA. The Palo Alto, California, company makes data analytics software used by the U.S. military and law enforcement agencies, along with banks, insurance companies and other private clients.

The lawsuit claims Palantir routinely eliminated Asian job candidates during the resume-screening and telephone-interview stages of the company's hiring process. The claims are based on a statistical analysis conducted by federal officials responsible for making sure government contractors comply with anti-discrimination rules.

Palantir denied the allegations, saying the government's analysis is flawed.

Palantir's chief executive is Alex Karp, who also co-founded the company.



Photo Credit: Getty Images file]]>
<![CDATA[Police Shootings of Black Men Spark Protests]]> Sun, 25 Sep 2016 04:48:52 -0400 http://media.nbcmiami.com/images/213*120/AP16268817332310_opt.jpg The fatal shootings of black men in separate incidents in Oklahoma, North Carolina and other states spawned protests in cities across the U.S.

Photo Credit: AP]]>
<![CDATA[The Top Trump-Clinton Debate Tweet? It's From 2012]]> Mon, 26 Sep 2016 23:43:18 -0400 http://media.nbcmiami.com/images/213*120/610601740-hillary-clinton-donald-trump-debate-tweets.jpg

Twitter was abuzz during the presidential debate Monday, but nothing grabbed people's attention like a tweet Donald Trump sent in 2012, according to the company.

Days before that year's election, Trump tweeted that global warming was a Chinese conspiracy "to make U.S. manufacturing non-competitive." It was the most retweeted tweet during the debate, according to Twitter's government and elections team.

So what made that obscure tweet rise to the top of the Twitter hive mind's consciousness? Hillary Clinton said early on in the debate that Trump called climate change a hoax, and he strongly denied it.

Twitter users, who have always jumped on candidates' statements during debates, were quick to fact check him with his own statements. That China example wasn't the only one.

Elsewhere online, Google's search data suggested that Hillary Clinton gained more visibility from the debate. The tech giant's data and visualizations lab, Google Trends, found that every state in the country was uniformly searching Clinton's name more than Trump's after the debate, where Trump had dominated beforehand.

And she dominated searches for long stretches in two key swing states: Ohio and Florida.



Photo Credit: Getty Images
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<![CDATA[Most Memorable Moments From 1st General Election Debate]]> Tue, 27 Sep 2016 09:50:24 -0400 http://media.nbcmiami.com/images/213*120/PL05Ma_1200x675_773938755547.jpg Hillary Clinton and Donald Trump squared off in the first presidential debate on Monday night. The candidates traded barbs and accusations throughout the often-tense 90 minute event at New York's Hofstra University; Clinton accused Trump of "a long record of engaging in racist behavior," referencing a justice department lawsuit accusing him of not renting apartments to African Americans. Trump mocked Clinton for her absence from the campaign trail in recent days, to which Clinton shot back that she did indeed prepare for the debate just as she has prepared to be president.]]> <![CDATA[Obama's Hard Stance on Ketchup]]> Tue, 27 Sep 2016 07:05:16 -0400 http://media.nbcmiami.com/images/213*120/AP_16145366840419.jpg

In this uncertain election season with its scandals, attacks and bald-faced lies, it’s refreshing when a politician takes a hardline stance on the world stage’s most pressing issues.

That’s exactly what President Barack Obama did when pressed by chef and television star Anthony Bourdain on how appropriate ketchup on a hot dog is.

“Is ketchup on a hot dog ever acceptable?” Bourdain asked the president on the season premiere of his television show “Parts Unknown.”

Obama’s response was a swift “No.”

Well… “It's not acceptable past the age of 8,” the president relented.

“My hot dog question might have been diplomatically problematic for a first-term president. He answered without hesitation -- like a Chicagoan,” Bourdain wrote of his recent bun cha meal with the president in Vietnam.

Bourdain also recently rattled off his favorite places to eat in Chicago during a Reddit AMAA.



Photo Credit: AP
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<![CDATA[Couple Locked Children in Cage]]> Tue, 27 Sep 2016 08:59:05 -0400 http://media.nbcmiami.com/images/213*120/Michael-and-Jennifer-Thalmann.jpg

Newington, Connecticut, police have arrested a couple accused of locking their children in dog cages as a form of punishment when they lived on Kirkham Street in Newington.

Michael Thalmann, 44, and Jennifer Thalmann, 48, of Audubon, Pennsylvania, turned themselves in to Newington police on active arrest warrants around 4 p.m. Sunday. They are each charged with cruelty to persons and risk of injury to a minor.

The couple is accused of striking their two adoptive children with paddles, failing to feed the children, and locking the children in dog cages.

They were each released on a $250,000 bond and appeared in court Monday, where they pleaded not guilty.



Photo Credit: Newington Police Department]]>
<![CDATA[Top Tweets on the 1st Presidential Debate]]> Tue, 27 Sep 2016 07:17:20 -0400 http://media.nbcmiami.com/images/213*120/AP+-+Hofstra+Debate+16+sized.jpg

Hillary Clinton and Donald Trump didn't hold back during the first debate of the 2016 general election. Because most viewers have a habit of watching through a second (and third) screen, Twitter feeds were equally intriguing. Here are some top reactions to Clinton and Trump’s grueling debate.



Photo Credit: AP
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<![CDATA[Greg Hardy Arrested on Drug Charges]]> Mon, 26 Sep 2016 20:27:28 -0400 http://media.nbcmiami.com/images/213*120/Greg-Hardy-mug-shot.jpg

Former Dallas Cowboys defensive end Greg Hardy faces a felony drug charge after he was arrested Sunday night in Richardson, police say.

Hardy, who is an NFL free agent after playing for the Cowboys in 2015, allegedly had 0.7 grams of cocaine in a wallet in his car. It was discovered after a traffic stop for failing to use a turn signal, a police affidavit states.

Hardy was stopped about 11:22 p.m. after turning onto Midway Drive from the 300 block of North Glenville Drive. The officer gave Hardy a verbal warning for the traffic violation but asked for his consent to search his 2010 white Dodge Challenger, the police report says.

He told the officer that he didn't know what the substance was and said he believed he got it while he was at a party Saturday night, according to police. Hardy said he passed his wallet around at the party because he was paying for everybody, and he said that must have been when someone put the substance in his wallet.

Hardy was booked into the Richardson City Jail, where he remained Monday afternoon. Bond was set at $5,000.

Hardy spent the first five years of his NFL career with the Carolina Panthers, before joining the Cowboys in 2015.

Hardy hasn't garnered much attention in free agency since he and the Cowboys parted ways after the 2015 season. He recorded six sacks in 12 games while playing for Dallas.

The defensive end made news stemming from a 2014 arrest for assaulting an ex-girlfriend and threatening to kill her. The charges were eventually expunged from Hardy's record.



Photo Credit: NBC 5 News/Richardson Police Dept.]]>
<![CDATA[Memorable Moments From Presidential Debates Past]]> Mon, 26 Sep 2016 13:56:26 -0400 http://media.nbcmiami.com/images/213*120/nixon-debate-P1.jpg

You can argue whether presidential debates have the power to swing an election, but they are a dependable source of images and sound bites that help color voters' perception of the candidates - for good and for bad. It began with the first televised debate between a tanned and vibrant John F. Kennedy and a peaked, flu-wracked Richard M. Nixon in 1960 and continued through 2012, when Mitt Romney's story about "binders full of women." Countless quips, gaffes and zingers have occurred in the intervening years. Here are some of the most memorable, in chronological order.

Welcome to television, Mr. Nixon

Pollsters found that people who listened to this debate on the radio thought that Nixon, the vice president, beat Kennedy. But those who followed on television, where Kennedy's youth and poise contrasted with Nixon's age and dourness, sided with Kennedy, who won the election. No single moment of this debate stands out; the entire episode illustrates how Nixon underestimated the power of television. Nixon would later run for president and win, but he refused to debate ever again.

Ford's foreign policy blunder

President Gerald Ford, who ascended to office after Nixon's resignation, was challenged by former Georgia Gov. Jimmy Carter in 1976. In this clip from the second of three debates, Ford tells an incredulous Max Frankel that "There is no Soviet domination of Eastern Europe, and there never will be under a Ford administration." Carter would later say that the debates helped him win the election.

Reagan's zingers

Carter and former California Gov. Ronald Reagan debated only once in 1980, a week before election day, and Reagan showed himself adept at two key debate techniques: affably diffusing an attack and distilling a candidacy down to a single phrase. When Carter criticized Reagan's position on Medicaid, Reagan quipped, "There you go again." And during his closing arguments, Reagan asked voters to ask themselves: "Are you better off than you were four years ago?" Both lines became classics, and Reagan won by a landslide.

Carter's Amy speech

Reagan's inspiring performance stood in stark contrast to Carter's flatness. That was exposed in his closing arguments, when he finished an argument about nuclear weapons by invoking his daughter, Amy. Some analysts point to this remark as the debate's worst.

Reagan strikes back

Reagan was challenged in 1984 by Walter Mondale, who'd served as vice president under Carter. Reagan maintained a large lead for most of the campaign. But Mondale appeared to gain ground in their first debate, when Reagan, who was, at 73, the oldest sitting president, appeared tired and a little disoriented. In the second debate, Reagan again showed his knack for amiably diffusing criticism by addressing the age issue head-on.

The rape question

The 1988 race between Massachusetts Gov. Michael Dukakis and Vice President George H.W. Bush featured two debates, the first of which was largely uneventful. But the second began with journalist Bernard Shaw asking Dukakis if he would support the death penalty for someone who raped and killed his wife. Dukakis, a staunch opponent of capital punishment, answered resolutely that he would not, but the dryness of his response cemented the prevailing image of him as reserved and stiff. Soon after the debate, Bush began to climb in the polls.

Perot's "giant sucking sound"

The series of debates in 1992 featured three candidates: President Bush, former Arkansas Gov. Bill Clinton and independent candidate Ross Perot, whose campaign was fueled by anti-Washington anger. Bush and Clinton spent much of the first debate attacking each other, and voters reacted in polls by declaring Perot the winner. In the second, Perot's straight-talking, humorous delivery reached a crescendo in his opening remarks, when he went on a tirade against the North American Free Trade Agreement, predicting that it would result in a massive loss of jobs to Mexico. The line became an instant hit.

Bush checks his watch

Later in the second debate of 1992, a member of the audience stood to ask the candidates a question about how the national debt had affected them personally. From the back of the stage, Bush glanced at his watch and then botched the question, struggling to explain himself before admitting, "I'm not sure I get it." A few minutes later, Clinton gave an impassioned response, and the debate was as good as won.

Gore tries to intimidate Bush

The last of three debates between Vice President Al Gore and Texas Gov. George W. Bush in 2000 was held in a town-hall meeting style, leaving the candidates free to roam the stage while answering questions. The exchanges between Bush and Gore had become increasingly testy, with Gore at times expressing impatience with Bush's answers. That tension came to a head during Bush's attempt to explain how he thought the two men differed. Gore stood up and approached Bush in what seemed to be an effort to intimidate him. But Bush's handling of it gave him the upper hand.

McCain: “that one”

The 2008 race featured three debates between Senators Barack Obama and John McCain. In the second, a town-hall style meeting, the candidates largely refrained from attacking each other's character but parried on policy in what was generally considered a boring exchange. Perhaps that is why the Democrats and the media fixated on a slight blunder by McCain as he tried to explain the two men's differences on energy policy. Emphasizing a point, he referred to Obama as "that one," which Obama's campaign tried to exploit as evidence that McCain was out of sorts and irascible. T-shirts and Facebook pages mocking the phrase sprouted up. Pundits argued whether it was that bad of a mistake, but it became the most discussed aspect of the debate, and that wasn't good for McCain.

Romney's "binders full of women"

In in answering a question about pay equity for women, Mitt Romney said during the 2012 presidential debate that as governor of Massachusetts he made an effort to include women in his administration. He said his team reached out to several women groups to find applicants and got "binders full of women." The commentary about Romney's phrase took off online even before his second debate with President Barack Obama wrapped up. 



Photo Credit: AP
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<![CDATA[Officer Pulls Chase Driver From Edge of Freeway Overpass]]> Tue, 27 Sep 2016 00:06:40 -0400 http://media.nbcmiami.com/images/211*120/09-26-2016-pursuit-takedown-1.JPG

A driver who led officers on a pursuit through three Southern California counties, smoking a cigarette and throwing trash out a window, was pulled from a freeway overpass by an officer, ending a tense standoff Monday morning in San Bernardino.

The hourlong pursuit came to an end when the driver of the stolen Toyota Camry exited the vehicle on the side of 215 Freeway with what appeared to be a piece of metal that was removed from the car. He walked across all freeway lanes and climbed onto the edge of an overpass, dangling his legs over the side, as officers approached with a K-9.

As he gestured with the wiper blade at one group of officers, another officer dashed up from behind the man and pulled him back from the ledge and onto the ground. Other officers joined the struggle and took the man, who appeared to be bleeding from his leg, into custody. 

"I knew that if I didn't take the opportunity that it could have been worse and luckily for me it worked out that I was able to help him,"said CHP Officer Reynaldo Avalos, who grabbed the man from the edge.

Paramedics treated the man on the side of the freeway. Details regarding his condition were not immediately available.

The man repeatedly said, "The system doesn't work. The system doesn't work, I tried to get a job," as paramedics wheeled him on a gurney to an ambulance.

The man said he had spent time on Skid Row and was "out of options."

The pursuit began at about 8:45 a.m. after a report of a stolen vehicle near Morongo Valley, just west of Joshua Tree National Park in Riverside County.

The black Toyota Camry was on the westbound 60 Freeway, near Moreno Valley, before the driver entered the Pomona and Diamond Bar areas. The driver exited onto the northbound 605 and eastbound 10 freeways in the Covina area and threw items, including a plastic bag, out the window before lighting a cigarette. 

The driver, the vehicle's lone occupant, doubled back into eastern Riverside County, passed the 15 Freeway transition and headed north on the 215 Freeway into San Bernardino County. 



Photo Credit: KNBC-TV
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<![CDATA[Jose Fernandez Remembered by MLB Teams]]> Mon, 26 Sep 2016 11:49:49 -0400 http://media.nbcmiami.com/images/187*120/GettyImages-610389982.jpg

Photo Credit: Getty Images]]>
<![CDATA[PHOTOS: African-American History Museum Opening]]> Mon, 26 Sep 2016 19:17:06 -0400 http://media.nbcmiami.com/images/213*120/20160924+Children+Embrace.jpg Celebrities, politicians and civil rights leaders joined thousands on the National Mall this weekend for a three-day festival event to celebrate the newest Smithsonian Museum — the National Museum of African American History and Culture. ]]> <![CDATA[Debate-Day Trump Snapchat Filter Takes Swipe at Clinton]]> Mon, 26 Sep 2016 16:38:33 -0400 http://media.nbcmiami.com/images/213*120/trump-crooked-hillary-snapchat-filter.jpg

Snapchat claims it reaches 41 percent of Americans between 18 and 34 years old on any given day.

Donald Trump's presidential campaign is trying to win that group over with a new Snapchat geofilter debuted on Monday, the day of his first debate with Hillary Clinton.

The star- and firework-spangled "Debate Day" filter uses Trump's trusted epithet for Clinton, "crooked Hillary" on top, where it reads: "Donald J. Trump vs. Crooked Hillary." The national, sponsored filter was paid for by Donald J. Trump for President, Inc., according to fine print on the filter itself and confirmed by Snapachat.

Geofilters are a feature on Snapchat that lets users overlay images onto their photos or videos. They're often of city or town names, but users can design and purchase their own filters to be used in certain places for periods of time. The filters must be approved by Snapchat. 

Clinton and her allies were outspending Trump's campaign in TV ads by a 5-to-1 margin as of last week, NBC News reported. Clinton has purchased ads on Snapchat before, including during the Republican National Convention, but didn't have a Snapchat filter of her own on Monday.

The Trump campaign — which has grown in part on the strength of the candidate's Twitter presence — is no stranger to using social media to score points in the debate. Earlier this month, Donald Trump Jr. drew outrage along with retweets when he posted an image showing the internet meme Pepe the Frog, which as been used by some white nationalists, next to his father.

Watch the debate here at 9 p.m. ET.



Photo Credit: NBC ]]>
<![CDATA[Debate Details Revealed: Clinton Gets 1st Question]]> Mon, 26 Sep 2016 10:19:06 -0400 http://media.nbcmiami.com/images/213*120/clinton-trump-texas-encuestas.jpg

WATCH the debate live at 9 p.m. ET.

Debate officials have released the details of Monday night's presidential debate between Democrat Hillary Clinton and Republican Donald Trump, NBC News reported.

Clinton will receive the first question from NBC News' Lester Holt, who will moderate the first debate of the election season at Hofstra University in Hempstead, New York.

The debate will 90 minutes long and divided into six, 15 minute "pods," the Commission on Presidential Debates announced on Sunday.

Clinton's podium will be stage left and Trump's podium will be stage right, the CPD said.



Photo Credit: Getty Images
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<![CDATA[How Should Trump Debate Clinton? Advice From a Man Who Knows]]> Mon, 26 Sep 2016 13:53:59 -0400 http://media.nbcmiami.com/images/213*120/clinton-trump-split-upset.jpg

WATCH the debate live at 9 p.m. ET.

The man famous for getting in Hillary Clinton’s face during the campaign that launched her political career has some debate advice for Donald Trump.

Stay at his lectern.

Rick Lazio should know. The former Republican congressman didn't — and paid the price for a performance that has become a textbook example of what not to do when your opponent is a woman.

Lazio, today a partner with the Jones Walker law firm, ran against Clinton in 2000 for the U.S. Senate. At their first debate in Buffalo, New York, he crossed the stage to Clinton's lectern, pointing his finger as he urged her to sign a pledge about limiting the funding of their race. He was seen as hectoring, his campaign faltered and she went on to win.

Lazio's misstep is being recalled as Clinton and Donald Trump prepare for their debate on Monday, pitting the first woman to run as a major party presidential candidate versus the former reality TV star who has made browbeating opponents a key to his success. "Little Marco," "Lyin' Ted" and "Low-energy Jeb" have given way to "Crooked Hillary," but will he fling insults at her when they meet at New York's Hofstra University? Will Clinton goad him to try to show he is not suited for the presidency?

Trump said that he would curb his disparaging tone at the debate, to be moderated by NBC News' Lester Holt. The 90-minute debate will be televised by NBC and streamed on this site at 9 p.m. ET Monday. 

"I'm going to be very respectful of her," he told Fox News' "Fox and Friends." "I think she deserves that and I'm going to be nice. And if she's respectful of me, that'll be nice."

That hasn't stopped him from mocking her on Twitter.

"Hillary is taking the day off again, she needs the rest," he tweeted Tuesday about her bout with pneumonia. "Sleep well Hillary — see you at the debate!"

For Clinton's part, she zeroed in on Trump's derisive comments when she spoke on Steve Harvey's radio show.

"I am going to do my very best to communicate as clearly and fearlessly as I can in the face of the insults and the attacks and the bullying and bigotry that we have seen coming from my opponent," Clinton said. "I can take it, Steve. I can take that kind of stuff. I have been at this, and I understand it is a contact sport."

Lazio, who said that neither Trump nor Clinton had earned his support, has several suggestions for Trump: Present a positive vision, be aware of non-verbal communication and don't go for the knock-out punch, but rather, amplify Clinton's negatives. Demonstrate enough knowledge of policy details to establish his credibility as president without trying to duel with someone who has been in and around Washington for nearly 25 years. And with nearly two-thirds of the public feeling that the country is on the wrong track, distinguish himself as the change agent and Clinton as more of the failed and uninspiring status quo.

"Have your team prepared and on high alert afterward to drive your debate message," he wrote. “There are two debates — as I well discovered — the actual event and what gets covered by the media and watched by the public afterward.

"And finally....stay at the podium!"



Photo Credit: Getty/NBC Universal
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<![CDATA[Elena Delle Donne Opens Up in Video]]> Mon, 26 Sep 2016 11:11:53 -0400 http://media.nbcmiami.com/images/213*120/GettyImages-514542562.jpg

Chicago Sky superstar Elena Delle Donne is well-known for her exploits on the court and her status as the defending WNBA MVP, but what you may not know is the story of how her bond with her sister resurrected her basketball career.

In a new video released by Gatorade, Delle Donne recounts the story of how she walked away from the UConn women’s basketball team to take care of her sister Lizzie, who has cerebral palsy and is blind and deaf.

"Lizzie has always been my strength, but going away to play college basketball meant that I had to say goodbye, and I just wasn't ready," she said. "Everybody thinks I came home to take care of her, but she was the one helping me."

She took a year off from basketball, but ultimately decided to come back to the sport and became a star at the University of Delaware. In the video, she describes how her sister’s love of the wind helped give her a new perspective on life.

"If you close your eyes, and you can't hear anything, and the wind comes across your face and blows your hair, it makes you feel a certain joy. To her, it's just pure joy and it's incredible to watch something that simple make her so happy," Delle Donne shared.

"I'll step outside after a rough practice, feel the wind, and it's like, 'Oh. There you are Liz,'" she added. "Liz has taught me so much. You don't focus on what you don't have - you celebrate what you do." 

Delle Donne has gone through other obstacles in her career as well, including contracting Lyme disease during her sophomore season. Eventually she overcame those challenges and was drafted by the Sky with the second overall pick in the 2013 WNBA Draft.

Unfortunately for Delle Donne, she has more adversity to go through now, as she’s dealing with recovery following thumb surgery earlier this month. The star forward is hoping to return to the court during the WNBA playoffs, but her timetable for recovery is unknown at this point.

Even with that latest setback, Delle Donne proves in the video that she is willing to take on any challenge, and going through adversity is something she’s become very adept at in her career.



Photo Credit: Getty Images
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<![CDATA[Boater Missing a Week Found Alive Off East Coast; Mom Still Missing ]]> Mon, 26 Sep 2016 15:13:02 -0400 http://media.nbcmiami.com/images/213*120/BLOCK-ISLAND-MISSING-BOAT.jpg

One of two boaters from Middletown, Connecticut, who was missing for a week was found alive at sea on a life raft, but the Coast Guard is not continuing the search for his mother, who is still missing.

Nathan Carman, 22, and his mother, 54-year-old Linda Carman, were reported missing Sept. 18 after heading out in the boat Chicken Pox and failing to return from a fishing trip off Point Judith, Rhode Island.

On Sunday afternoon, a China-based freighter called Orient Lucky spotted a life raft 115 nautical miles off Martha's Vineyard, found Nathan Carman inside of it and picked him up, according to the U.S. Coast Guard.

Nathan, a Middletown native who has been living in Vermont, was wearing a life vest and had an emergency bag of food and water. But there was still no sign of Linda Carman.

Petty Officer 3rd Class Nicole Groll said during a news conference on Monday that the chances of Linda Carman surviving are minimal.

"Unfortunately the decision to suspend a case is never an easy one and we will not be reopening the search for Linda Carman at this time due to the fact that survivability -- we're beyond that point," Groll said.

Signs have been placed outside Linda Carman's home that ask people to "Never Give Up."

She said the Coast Guard took into consideration the weather, water temperature, the fact that Linda Carman was unprotected from the elements and had no food and water. The only one life raft aboard the Chicken Pox was the one Nathan had so his mother would not have access to one. 

"The likelihood of her being alive is minimal," Groll said.

Nathan Carman spoke briefly with the Coast Guard and told them the motorized boat the mother and son were in started taking on water off the coast of New York on Sunday, in an area called Block Canyon.

Nathan went looking for his mother to get in the life raft, but he couldn't find her, according to the Coast Guard.  

Nathan is due to arrive in Boston sometime n Tuesday night. 

The Coast Guard search included an area near Block Island and it expanded through 62,000 square miles, from the coast of Rhode Island to New York and as far as New Jersey.

Sharon Hartstein, who has been friends with Linda for more than 20 years, said Linda let her know she would be leaving Ram’s Point Marina in Point Judith early on the morning of Sunday, Sept. 18, and they were supposed to come back later that day. They went out in a 31-foot aluminum fishing boat named the Chicken Pox, The Associated Press reported.

She showed us the last text messages between her and Linda: “So she sent this email Friday, I mean text message, saying that they were going from ‘Rams Point around 1 [a.m. Sunday], back by 9 [a.m. Sunday]. Call me 12 noon if you don’t hear from me. Thanks for being there.’”

Nathan – who suffers from Asperger’s Syndrome -- was the center of a 2011 investigation when he went missing and was found in Virginia.

A friend of the family said on Sunday that Nathan is in good condition.



Photo Credit: United States Coast Guard]]>
<![CDATA[Clinton Leads Trump by 5 Ahead of 1st Debate: Poll]]> Mon, 26 Sep 2016 16:15:19 -0400 http://media.nbcmiami.com/images/213*120/GettyImages-605904136.jpg

Hillary Clinton takes a five-point lead among likely voters over Donald Trump into Monday night's presidential debate, according to the latest NBC News|SurveyMonkey Weekly Election Tracking Poll, released hours before the debate kicked off.

Clinton's 45-40 lead over Trump was unchanged from the week before, the poll found. But Clinton's head-to-head matchup with Trump improved by two points over the previous week, and she now leads him 51-44, NBC News reported.

Libertarian candidate Gary Johnson trails the front-runners with 10 percent of those surveyed in the online poll, from September 19 through September 25. Green Party candidate Jill Stein has 3 percent support.

Clinton leads among millennials and gained ground in the 18-29 age group, where the third-party candidates maintained comparatively large bastions of support, while only 5 percent of those 65 and over support Johnson and only 1 percent support Stein.



Photo Credit: Getty Images, File]]>
<![CDATA[Mike Ditka on Kaepernick's Protest]]> Mon, 26 Sep 2016 08:06:10 -0400 http://media.nbcmiami.com/images/213*120/mike+ditka+GettyImages-463267928.jpg

Former Bears coach Mike Ditka has weighed in on the protests sparked by 49ers quarterback Colin Kaepernick, and he certainly did not hold back. 

"I think it’s a problem, anybody who disrespects this country and the flag," Ditka said in a radio interview Friday. "If they don't like the country, they don't like our flag, get the hell out, that's what I think."

"I have no respect for Colin Kaepernick, he probably has no respect for me," the Hall of Fame coach continued. "That’s his choice. My choice is that I like this country. I respect our flag."

"And I don't see all the atrocities going on in this country that people say are going on," he added. "I see opportunities if people want to look for opportunities. Now, if they don't want to look for them, then you can find problems with anything."

"But this is the land of opportunity because you can be anything you want to be if you work. Now if you don't work, that's a different problem," he concluded. 

Ditka's disapproval of the protests came just days after three players on the Philadelphia Eagles raised their fists at Soldier Field ahead of the Bears' home opener Monday night. 

That demonstration joined the national conversation ignited by Kaepernick who sat, then kneeled, for the playing of the national anthem beginning in August to call attention to the oppression of minorities across the United States. 

Since then, Kaepernick has been joined by several other NFL players, including four members of the Miami Dolphins, Kansas City Chiefs cornerback Marcus Peters, and Broncos linebacker Brandon Marshall.

While some have expressed support for the message of the demonstrations, the protests have sparked outrage among others, including local police unions in Miami and San Francisco, both of which have threatened some form of boycott. 

A recent poll found Kaepernick to be the most disliked player in the NFL, which was conducted just days before his cover for Time Magazine's October issue was revealed. 

He revealed Tuesday that he has received death threats over his protest, and pledged to donate $100,000 in each of the next 10 months to organizations that work toward goals consistent with his message of fighting racial inequality.

This is not the first time Ditka has spoken out on social or political issues. A well-documented conservative, he has publicly expressed support for Donald Trump and flirted with the idea of speaking at the Republican National Convention in July.



Photo Credit: Getty Images]]>