Amazon Begins Offering More Than $70 Million in Refunds for Kids' Unauthorized In-App Purchase - NBC 6 South Florida
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Amazon Begins Offering More Than $70 Million in Refunds for Kids' Unauthorized In-App Purchase

"Consumers affected by Amazon's practices can now be compensated for charges they didn't expect or authorize," a Federal Trade Commission official has said

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    Amazon Begins Offering More Than $70 Million in Refunds for Kids' Unauthorized In-App Purchase
    David McNew/Getty Images, File

    Anyone who had a child incur charges through in-app Amazon purchases without their permission may now claim a refund from Amazon.

    Amazon has reached out to all eligible customers via email about the refund-eligible charges, which total more than $70 million and were incurred between November 2011 and May 2016, according to a Federal Trade Commission announcement. 

    The charges were incurred because Amazon didn't require a password for purchases made in apps, allowing children to buy upgrades on apps that were otherwise free.

    Anyone who believes they are eligible for refunds may check here, or the Important Messages folder in the Amazon Message Center.

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    Refund requests may be submitted through May 28, 2018, and anyone with questions can call Amazon at 866-216-1072.

    The FTC had sued Amazon over the charges, but the parties agreed to end appeals in April after a judge's ruling and begin implementing the refund program.

    "This case demonstrates what should be a bedrock principle for all companies — you must get customers' consent before you charge them," said Thomas B. Pahl, acting director of the FTC's Bureau of Consumer Protection, in a statement at the time. "Consumers affected by Amazon's practices can now be compensated for charges they didn't expect or authorize."