Ivanka Shows 'Softer Side' of Donald Trump at RNC | NBC 6 South Florida
Decision 2016

Decision 2016

Full coverage of the race for the White House

Ivanka Shows 'Softer Side' of Donald Trump at RNC

Ivanka Trump said her father "will fight for equal pay for equal work"



    Ivanka Trump introduced her father, Donald J. Trump, on the final night of the Republican National Convention, referencing his construction experience as credentials for the presidency. (Published Thursday, July 21, 2016)

    Donald Trump's daughter promised Thursday that her father will fight for equal pay for women and affordable childcare for parents, issues the Republican nominee has rarely if ever addressed on the campaign trail. 

    Ivanka Trump got an enthusiastic welcome at the Republican National Convention. Her primetime speech elicited repeated applause and much praise from delegates in the arena. 

    Touting a side of her father rarely seen on the campaign trail, Ivanka Trump cast her father as a leader who would fight to address the student debt problem and would be a champion for equal pay for mothers and single women. 

    "As president, my father will change the labor laws that were put in place at a time when women weren't a significant portion of the workplace, and he will focus on making quality childcare affordable and accessible for all," Ivanka Trump said. 

    Trump has not addressed childcare costs or the gender pay gap so far in his 2016 presidential bid. These are issues usually touted by Democrats. 

    Trump's past statements on women in the workplace have included calling pregnancy "an inconvenience" and telling a voter in New Hampshire last year that women will receive the same pay as men "if they do as good a job." 

    On Thursday, Ivanka Trump said her father "will fight for equal pay for equal work." 

    Ivanka Trump vowed that her father would "focus on making affordable childcare affordable and accessible for all" if elected. 

    Trump Will Honor Election Results 'If I Win'

    [NATL] Trump Will Honor Presidential Election Results 'If I Win'
    Speaking at a rally in Ohio on Oct. 20, 2016, Donald Trump said that he would accept the presidential election results if they were in his favor. "I would like to promise and pledge to all of my voters and supporters and to all the people of the United Staes that I will totally accept the results of this great and historic presidential election -- if I win,” Donald Trump said, emphasizing the last three words by pointing into the crowd. The rally was held the day following the final debate, during which the issue of whether he would accept the election results came up. At the debate, he said he would have to wait and see what the results were. (Published Thursday, Oct. 20, 2016)

    Ivanka Trump was a big hit among the delegates. 

    "She is showing the softer side" of Trump, said Chris Herrod, state director for Ted Cruz in Utah. "She hit the gender pay issue which is very important. And she talked about the family. I think she's done very, very well." 

    Wisconsin delegate Kathy Kiernan called Ivanka's speech "perfect." 

    "I think she's amazing. I think that looking at his children and how great they all are and how much they all love their father tells you a lot about the man as a parent," Kiernan said. "I think she's one of his best assets." 

    Trump, Clinton Trade Insults at Dinner

    [NATL-NY] Trump, Clinton Trade Insults at Dinner
    Bitter presidential rivals Hillary Clinton and Donald Trump had one more face-to-face showdown before Election Day. They tried to make it funny but plenty of the jokes bombed, and some even earned scattered boos. Watch each of the candidates' roasts in their entirety here. (Published Friday, Oct. 21, 2016)

    California delegate Shawn Steel said Ivanka Trump's speech was "the high point of the entire convention for me." 

    "He does the blue collar, she does the millennials. It's a powerful combination," Steel said. "This woman I've been saying for some time is the greatest asset Donald trump has." 

    Associated Press writers Matthew Daly, Jill Colvin, Josh Lederman, Erica Werner and Jeff Horwitz in Washington contributed to this report.