Everything you need to know for the 2014 hurricane season

How to Prepare Your Pets for a Hurricane

Animals should never be left behind during a storm

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    NEWSLETTERS

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    During a storm, you want to make sure every member of your family is protected, including your pets. The Federal Emergency Management Agency urges pet owners not to leave their pets behind and to know which shelters are pet-friendly in the event of evacuation.

    Here are FEMA's guidelines for caring for animals during a hurricane:

    Forecasters Predict Above Average 2013 Atlantic Hurricane Season

    [MI] Forecasters Predict Above Average 2013 Atlantic Hurricane Season
    The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration predicted 13 to 20 named storms for the 2013 Atlantic hurricane season. NOAA administrator Kathryn Sullivan spoke about the predcitions to the media on Wednesday. (Published Thursday, May 23, 2013)

    To Prepare Shelter for Pets:

    • Call your local emergency management office, animal shelter or animal control office to get advice and information.
    • If you are unable to return to your home right away, you may need to board your pet. Find out where pet boarding facilities are located. Be sure to research some outside your local area in case local facilities close.
    • Most boarding kennels, veterinarians and animal shelters will need your pet's medical records to make sure all vaccinations are current. Include copies in your "pet survival" kit along with a photo of your pet.
    • Some animal shelters will provide temporary foster care for owned pets in times of disaster but this should be considered only as a last resort.
    • If you have no alternative but to leave your pet at home, there are some precautions you must take, but remember that leaving your pet at home alone can place your animal in great danger! Confine your pet to a safe area inside - NEVER leave your pet chained outside! Leave them loose inside your home with food and plenty of water. Remove the toilet tank lid, raise the seat and brace the bathroom door open so they can drink. Place a notice outside in a visible area, advising what pets are in the house and where they are located. Provide a phone number where you or a contact can be reached as well as the name and number of your vet.

    What to Do With Pets During a Storm:

    • Bring your pets inside immediately.
    • Have newspapers on hand for sanitary purposes. Feed the animals moist or canned food so they will need less water to drink.
    • Animals have instincts about severe weather changes and will often isolate themselves if they are afraid. Bringing them inside early can stop them from running away. Never leave a pet outside or tied up during a storm.
    • Separate dogs and cats. Even if your dogs and cats normally get along, the anxiety of an emergency situation can cause pets to act irrationally. Keep small pets away from cats and dogs.
    • In an emergency, you may have to take your birds with you. Talk with your veterinarian or local pet store about special food dispensers that regulate the amount of food a bird is given. Make sure that the bird is caged and the cage is covered by a thin cloth or sheet to provide security and filtered light.

    What to Do With Pets After a Storm:

    • If after a disaster you have to leave town, take your pets with you. Pets are unlikely to survive on their own.
    • In the first few days after the disaster, leash your pets when they go outside. Always maintain close contact. Familiar scents and landmarks may be altered and your pet may become confused and lost. Also, snakes and other dangerous animals may be brought into the area with flood areas. Downed power lines are a hazard.
    • The behavior of your pets may change after an emergency. Normally quiet and friendly pets may become aggressive or defensive. Watch animals closely. Leash dogs and place them in a fenced yard with access to shelter and water.

    If You Have Large Animals:

    • Ensure all animals have some form of identification.
    • Evacuate animals whenever possible. Map out primary and secondary routes in advance.
    • Make available vehicles and trailers needed for transporting and supporting each type of animal. Also make available experienced handlers and drivers. Note: It is best to allow animals a chance to become accustomed to vehicular travel so they are less frightened and easier to move.
    • Ensure destinations have food, water, veterinary care and handling equipment.
    • If evacuation is not possible, animal owners must decide whether to move large animals to shelter or turn them outside.

    If Evacuating Animals to a Pet-Friendly Shelter: 

    • Provide proof of residency within an evacuation zone
    • Present medical and current vaccination records for each pet
    • Make sure your pet has received annual rabies vaccinations
    • Keep your county pet license visible
    • Pet owners must bring supplies for themselves and their pet(s)
    • Check how many pets per household are allowed at the shelt
    • Family member must remain in the PEC with the pet(s)

    For a list of pet-friendly shelters, click here.

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