Trump Visits Flint; Mayor Not Interested in 'Photo Ops' | NBC 6 South Florida
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    “There should be a public defender system for children,” said Kristie-Ann Padrón, an attorney with Catholic Charities, a nonprofit that took Arlin and her brother’s case for free. “They are not legally competent to sign a contract. How could they be expected to represent themselves in court?”

    Padrón says, if deported, some of the children have nothing to go back to.

    “Some were suffering from gang violence’” she said.

    With the help of Catholic Charities, Arlin and her brother won their asylum case.

    Three years have passed, he’s an honors student in high school. Arlin has learned English and works as a supervisor at a movie theatre while she gets her degree.

    “I’m doing mechanical engineering and I want to work with the NASA,” Arlin said.

    The NBC6 Investigators spent time in immigration court. We spoke with several kids who were facing a Miami judge alone without representation. They told us in Spanish that they fear being deported back.

    Most immigration judges we saw in Miami tried to get unaccompanied minors help with non-profit attorneys but those organizations say there just isn’t enough free legal aid to meet the demand.

    They say they are always looking for attorneys willing to donate their services.

    " name="&lpos=navigation hover&lid=thousands of immigrant children face a judge without an attorney">Thousands of Immigrant Children Face a Judge Without an Attorney
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[NATL] Trump Visits Flint; Mayor Not Interested in 'Photo Ops'
Candidate cut off, heckled during speech at Flint church

Donald Trump was cut off and chastised by a pastor in Flint, Mich., as he addressed her congregation on Wednesday.

Trump was criticizing his opponent Hillary Clinton's when Rev. Faith Green Timmons abruptly interrupted.

She said: "Mr. Trump, I invited you here to thank us for what we've done in Flint, not give a political speech."

Trump replied, "Ok, that's good," and resumed speaking about Flint.

Earlier Wednesday, Trump toured a water treatment plant that has not been operational since last fall. Flint's water supply was found to be contaminated with lead, which has affected an estimated 100,000 residents since 2014.

Flint Mayor Karen Weaver, a Democrat, said the Trump campaign has not offered any help and did not consult her before making plans to visit Wednesday. 

Weaver said in a statement that "Flint is focused on fixing the problems caused by lead contamination of our drinking water, not photo ops." She said she would be in Washington during Trump's visit.

Residents of Flint held a press conference Wednesday morning accusing Trump of using the city as a "prop" for his campaign. 

"Where the hell have you been?" asked Ron Bieber, president of the American Federation of Labor and Congress of Industrial Organizations in Michigan. He said Trump "hasn't lifted a finger" to help the people of Flint and that if he cared, he'd write a check during his visit Wednesday for $10 million to deal with the crisis.

Bieber said Hillary Clinton, who visited the city in February, "was the first presidential candidate to speak up about the Flint water crisis. She’s the reason we had a presidential debate in Flint."

The Michigan Republican Party said at the time that Clinton was exploiting the crisis in Flint for political gain.

“Families and residents in Flint deserve better than being used as political pawns by a presidential candidate," Michigan Republican Party chairwoman Ronna Romney McDaniel had said in a statement. "This visit is not an act of benevolence; it is a calculated campaign tactic — an attempt to grab headlines by a struggling campaign."

In recent weeks, the Trump campaign has increased its outreach to African-American voters. The majority of Flint residents are black.