Algae Found in Miami-Dade Canal to Be Tested - NBC 6 South Florida

Algae Found in Miami-Dade Canal to Be Tested

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    Algae Found in Miami-Dade Canal to Be Tested

    A type of algae that could be spilling into Biscayne Bay has some wondering if it's as toxic as the algae that's devastating parts of central Florida. NBC 6 contacted the South Florida water management district about this Monday and what the resident told us they saw along a canal in a Miami Shores neighborhood. (Published Monday, July 11, 2016)

    A type of algae that could be spilling into Biscayne Bay has some wondering if it's as toxic as the algae that's devastating parts of central Florida.

    NBC 6 contacted the South Florida water management district about this Monday and what the resident told us they saw along a canal in a Miami Shores neighborhood. Officials said they are hoping a team from the state's Department of Environmental Protection will be out soon to test the water in the canal.

    Residents say over the weekend the algae was everywhere. Green Algae floating from the bay into this canal. Residents like Michael Schock said they've never seen it like this before.

    "In the late afternoon, there was some type of green algae that was floating on top of the water. Unlike anything I have seen before. I was concerned about the algae," Schock said.

    The canal runs from Biscayne Bay into Miami Shores in Northeast Miami-Dade and cuts under Biscayne Boulevard and heads further inland. Boaters cleaning their vessels also said the volume of the algae was surprising to them too.

    Experts like FIU Professor Kathy Rein are now out gathering samples across the area in Palm Beach County, where toxic algae was recently found.

    "The problem is when we have a lot of nutrients entering the water system you can have a massive growth of this organism," Rein said. "It's certainly possible to have to have a Microsystis bloom down here as well."

    Schock normally has his kids Brandon and Zach in the water paddle boarding and fishing but no more. The algae flowing into the canal has all of them back on dry land.

    "I would like to see what they have to say. Until then I am not going to go into the water. I am not going to let the kids go into the water either," he said.

    "I would definitely avoid any kind of recreational use of the water, swimming, you might accidentally swallow some water, or waterskiing," Rein said.

    The state has set up and hotline to report algal blooms: 855-305-3903. They've also set up a website with information, which can be found here.