Donald Trump

Clinton, Trump Campaigns Making Late Push For Florida Voters With Visits Planned This Weekend

As the hours tick down toward Election Day, both major party candidates and their running mates will be in the Sunshine State this weekend looking to make a final push for votes.

Democratic Party nominee Hillary Clinton – who spent time earlier this week at events in Broward County – announced she will return to South Florida on Saturday, though her campaign has not released her exact location. Clinton’s Vice Presidential nominee, Sen. Tim Kaine, will be at a rally on Friday in Melbourne for supporters.

On the Republican side, nominee Donald Trump – who was in Miami earlier this week for an event at Bayfront Park – will be in Tampa on Saturday. His running mate, Gov. Mike Pence, will attend an event in West Miami on Friday evening.

Both candidates remain locked in a tight battle for the 29 electoral votes Florida holds – which could ultimately decide who the 45th President of the United States will be.

Nearly 5.3 million Floridians have voted early in the Sunshine State, or nearly 41 percent of all active registered voters.
 
  Numbers released by the state Division of Elections Friday show the number of voters casting ballots early during this year's presidential election is higher than in 2012. That year nearly 4.8 million Floridians either voted by mail or cast a ballot during early voting.
 
  The voting between Republicans and Democrats is just about even with a gap of less than 2,000 votes separating the two parties. Nearly 1 million voters registered with no party affiliation have also voted.

Nearly 5.3 million Floridians have voted early in the Sunshine State, or nearly 41 percent of all active registered voters. Numbers released by the state Division of Elections Friday show the number of voters casting ballots early during this year's presidential election is higher than in 2012. That year nearly 4.8 million Floridians either voted by mail or cast a ballot during early voting.   

The voting between Republicans and Democrats is just about even with a gap of less than 2,000 votes separating the two parties. Nearly 1 million voters registered with no party affiliation have also voted.

Copyright AP - Associated Press
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