Florida

Florida High Court Rules Against Miami Traffic Ticket Service

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A policeman placing a parking ticket on a car window. (Photo by: Jeffrey Greenberg/Universal Images Group via Getty Images)

A Miami company that offered services to fight traffic tickets was practicing law without authorization, The Florida Supreme Court ruled Thursday.

The founder of TIKD, Christopher Riley, is not a lawyer. Rather he created an app and a website in which people could upload photos of their tickets and the company would then hire a lawyer to fight them.

“As a nonlawyer, TIKD simply lacks the skill or training to ensure the quality of the legal services provided to the public through the licensed attorneys it contracts with, nor does it possess the ability to ensure compliance with the Rules of Professional Conduct,” the court wrote.

TIKD is no longer a registered corporation in Florida. The state Division of Corporations revoked that status last month. TIKD's website is down, its Twitter account has been suspended and its Facebook page hasn't been updated since 2018. A number listed for Riley in previous corporate filings was disconnected.

Copyright AP - Associated Press