coronavirus pandemic

Florida Vaccine Updates: FEMA Sites Relocated, Johnson & Johnson Vaccine Out of Stock

Here's what we know today about the coronavirus outbreak in Florida, and the effort to stop it

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As a limited supply of the coronavirus vaccine has become available across Florida, residents are understandably anxious to know when they will be able to stand in line for a dose.

Two sites run by FEMA will be moving to new locations starting Thursday while the state could be welcoming more people to get their doses in a matter of days.

Here's what we know today about the coronavirus outbreak in Florida, and the effort to stop it.

Two Miami-Dade FEMA Vaccination Sites Relocate Starting Thursday

From Thursday, March 18th to Tuesday, March 23rd these sites will now relocate to the following locations from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m.:

  • Charles Hadley Park at 1350 NW 50th Street
  • South Miami-Dade Cultural Arts Center at 10950 SW 211th Street

Officials have not said if they will stay at these sites or move again next week.


DeSantis Says Florida Could Lower Vaccine Eligibility Age by End of March, Discusses Johnson & Johnson Vaccine Out of Stock

Gov. Ron DeSantis said that the vaccine eligibility age could be lowered to 55 in Florida "some time in March."

Speaking at a vaccination site in Palm Harbor, DeSantis said that the demand for vaccine doses had begun to "teeter out" among the 65+ age group.

The governor also noted that there is no more stock of the Johnson & Johnson vaccine coming to Florida "for the foreseeable future."


COVID-19 Vaccines Recommended for Autoimmune Patients

Millions of Americans suffer from chronic autoimmune diseases, which could make them more vulnerable to the coronavirus. While antibodies protect healthy people when they get infected, their bodies do the opposite.

While the data is limited, the American College of Rheumatology (ACR) found these patients appear to have a higher risk of a serious coronavirus infection.

But the American College of Rheumatology recommends these patients get the COVID-19 vaccine saying the benefit “outweighs the potential risk” of “flare or the disease worsening.” For more on their efforts, click here for the story from NBC 6 Responds investigator Myriam Maishy.

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