Four Years After BP Spill, Beach Monitors Still on the Job - NBC 6 South Florida

Four Years After BP Spill, Beach Monitors Still on the Job

The two remaining oil spill monitors have discovered more than 46,000 thousand tar balls and 3,190 pounds of submerged tar mats in the last year.

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    FILE - In a June 23, 2010 file photo, crews work to clean up oil from the Deepwater Horizon oil spill washed ashore at Pensacola Beach in Pensacola Fla. In a reversal, the Obama administration says it will not pursue offshore drilling in East Coast waters, including the eastern Gulf of Mexico. A senior administration official told The Associated Press on Wednesday, Dec. 1,, 2010 that because of the BP oil spill, the Interior Department will not propose any new oil drilling in the East Coast for at least the next seven years. (AP Photo/ Michael Spooneybarger, File)

    Four years after the massive 2010 BP oil spill, monitors from Florida's Department of Environmental Protection continue to find thousands of tar balls on beaches in the western Panhandle.

    The Pensacola News Journal reports that the two remaining oil spill monitors have discovered more than 46,000 thousand tar balls and 3,190 pounds of submerged tar mats in the last year. The state of Florida plans to keep the monitors in the region indefinitely.

    Pensacola Beach, Escambia County and Gulf Islands National Seashore officials say the state monitors are critical because BP and the Coast Guard have disbanded the major oil spill monitoring effort created in the aftermath of the massive 2010 spill.

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