blood moon

How to Watch the ‘Blood Moon' Eclipse in South Florida on Sunday Night

South Floridians will have a great view of the "blood moon" gracing the night sky this Sunday

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South Floridians will have a great view of the "blood moon" gracing the night sky this Sunday.

After a weekend of scattered storms across South Florida, the southeast skies are set to clear up just in time for the spectacular lunar eclipse.

This total lunar eclipse — the first since 2019 in the continental United States — runs from 9:32 p.m. on Sunday to 2:50 a.m. on Monday.

This celestial phenomenon occurs when Earth passes directly between the moon and the sun and casts a shadow on our constant, cosmic companion. The moon will be 225,000 miles (362,000 kilometers) away at the peak of the eclipse — around midnight on the U.S. East Coast.

The total phase of the eclipse, also called the “blood moon” phase, occurs from 11:29 p.m. to 12:53 a.m. and peaks at 12:11 a.m. when the Earth’s shadow completely covers the sun.

So what do you need to watch the eclipse Sunday night? According to NASA's Noah Petro, a planetary geologist who specializes in the moon, all you need is “patience and eyeballs.”

“This is this gradual, slow, wonderful event that as long as it’s clear where you are, you get to see it,” Petro said.

If you don't have a clear view, NASA will be providing a live stream of the eclipse from various locations; so will the Slooh network of observatories.

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