Hurricane Season 2021

NOAA Maintains ‘Above Average' Storm Prediction for 2021 Hurricane Season

Already in the 2021 season, five named systems have formed with Hurricane Elsa being the earliest fifth named storm on record

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With the 2021 Atlantic hurricane season in its third month, National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration forecasters are saying there are no signs of any slowing down when it comes to activity.

The mid-season update released Wednesday predicts between 15 and 21 total storms, including between seven and 10 hurricanes with as many as five of those being Category 3 or higher.

NOAA

“After a record-setting start, the 2021 Atlantic hurricane season does not show any signs of relenting as it enters the peak months ahead,” said NOAA administrator Dr. Rick Spinrad.

Already in the 2021 season, five named systems have formed with Hurricane Elsa being the earliest fifth named storm on record.

Meteorologist Ryan Phillips has the items you must need to be ready for a storm.

Scientists predict the likelihood of an above average season at 65 percent, with just a 10 percent chance of a below-normal season.

“A mix of competing oceanic and atmospheric conditions generally favor above-average activity for the remainder of the Atlantic hurricane season, including the potential return of La Nina in the months ahead,” said NOAA lead seasonal hurricane forecaster Matthew Rosencrans.

NOAA predicted an "above-normal" 2021 Atlantic hurricane season, with 13-20 named storms expected during their May 20th outlook.

The 2020 Atlantic Hurricane Season was record-breaking, with 30 named storms and 13 hurricanes, including six major hurricanes. The 2020 season was only the second time the Greek alphabet was utilized to complete a season.

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