DeVos, Unions Drive Democratic Candidates to Back Away From Charter Schools - NBC 6 South Florida
Decision 2020

Decision 2020

The latest news on the race for president in 2020

DeVos, Unions Drive Democratic Candidates to Back Away From Charter Schools

Supporters and opponents of charter schools alike point to a long list of potential reasons for the shift among national Democrats away from Barack Obama’s position

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    Charter schools — a type of public school that is independently operated and whose staff is often non-unionized — have long been a divisive issue within Democratic circles. Now, they're increasingly falling out of favor with the party's current crop of presidential candidates, NBC News reports.

    "Charter schools are led by unaccountable, private bodies, and their growth has drained funding from the public school system," Sen. Bernie Sanders' campaign said in a press release.

    "For-profit charter schools should not be part of our vision for the future," South Bend, Indiana, Mayor Pete Buttigieg told reporters. "And I think the expansion of charter schools in general is something that we need to really draw back on until we've corrected what needs to be corrected in terms of underfunded public education."

    Several candidates, including former Vice President Joe Biden and Sen. Elizabeth Warren, D-Mass., have also criticized for-profit charters, a narrower status that the National Alliance for Public Charter Schools claims applies to only 12 percent of schools. The dominant stance in the field, however, has been indifference.

    Watch: Ta-Nehisi Coates’ Full Opening Statement at House Hearing on Reparations

    [NATL] Watch: Ta-Nehisi Coates’ Full Opening Statement at House Hearing on Reparations

    Ta-Nehisi Coates, author of “The Case for Reparations,” testified before a House Judiciary subcommittee during a hearing on whether the United States should consider compensation for the descendants of slaves. 

    He delivered a rebuttal to Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell's comments that "no one currently alive was responsible for that," which Coates called a "strange theory of governance." 

    "Well into this century the United States was still paying out pensions to the heirs of civil war soldiers," he said. "We honor treaties that date back some 200 years despite no one being alive who signed those treaties. Many of us would love to be taxed for the things we are solely and individually responsible for. But we are American citizens and this bound to a collective enterprise that extends beyond our individual and personal reach."

    (Published Wednesday, June 19, 2019)