Trump Washes His Hands of Insurgency Against GOP Incumbents - NBC 6 South Florida
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Trump Washes His Hands of Insurgency Against GOP Incumbents

President Trump spent much of Friday and Saturday morning hashing out his 2018 agenda with GOP House and Senate leaders, top White House aides and select Cabinet members at the presidential retreat at Camp David

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    Trump Washes His Hands of Insurgency Against GOP Incumbents
    Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images, File
    A file photo of President Donald Trump on Dec. 6, 2017, in Washington.

    President Donald Trump says he's done campaigning for insurgents challenging incumbent Republican members of Congress.

    Trump told reporters after meeting GOP House and Senate leaders at Camp David on Saturday that he's planning a robust schedule of campaigning for the 2018 midterm elections and that includes involvement in the Republican primaries. He'll campaign for incumbents, he said, and "anybody else that has my kind of thinking."

    But after a stinging loss in Alabama, Trump said he's done supporting challengers, declaring: "I don't see that happening." Trump had supported Roy Moore after he won the GOP primary. Moore's defeat in the subsequent special election handed Democrats another seat in the Senate.

    Trump spent much of Friday and Saturday morning hashing out his 2018 agenda with GOP House and Senate leaders, top White House aides and select Cabinet members at the presidential retreat at Camp David. He described the sessions as perhaps transformative in certain ways."

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    A long list of high-stakes topics were on the agenda, from national security and infrastructure to the budget and 2018 midterm election strategy. Though Democrats were not included in the discussions, the leaders — some dressed casually in jeans, khakis and sweaters — said they were optimistic that more Democrats would be working with Republicans.

    "We hope that 2018'll be a year of more bipartisan cooperation," Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell told reporters, predicting a "significant number of Democrats" would be interested in supporting Trump's agenda.

    It's a reflection of reality: Republicans hold a razor-thin majority in the Senate and will need Democrats' support to push through most legislation. It's unclear, however, the extent to which Trump is willing to work with Democrats to achieve that goal.

    Trump, for instance, declared Saturday that he will not sign legislation protecting hundreds of thousands of young people who were brought to the U.S. illegally as children unless Congress agrees to fund his promised border wall as well as overhaul the legal immigration system. Trump last year ended the Obama-era Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals program, which shielded more than 700,000 people from deportation and gave then the right to work legally in the country, and gave Congress until March to find a fix.

    Trump said any deal must stop immigrants from being able to sponsor their extended family members and must end the diversity visa lottery, which draws immigrants from under-represented parts of a world . That's in addition to funding for the southern border wall, a deeply unpopular idea among Democrats.

    The administration on Friday unveiled a 10-year, $18 billion request for the wall that roiled the immigration talks and infuriated Democrats who've spent months in negotiations, increasing the prospect of a government shutdown.

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    But Trump appeared oblivious to the anger on Saturday. "We hope that we're going to be able to work out an arrangement with the Democrats," he said. "It's something, certainly, that I'd like to see happen."

    Louisiana Rep. Steve Scalise, the House majority whip, also expressed guarded optimism when he returned to his state after the retreat. "For a few weeks now it seems like there's the ability to get an agreement reached but none has been finalized yet," he said of the effort to protect the young immigrants who came under Obama's program. "I think the framework is there and the president is fully engaged."

    Trump also appeared Saturday to back away from efforts to overhaul the welfare system, which just weeks ago had been identified as one of the White House's top two legislative priorities, along with a massive infrastructure investment plan.

    McConnell had argued that welfare reform was a no-go given Democratic opposition. And Trump appeared to have come around.

    "It's a subject that's very dear to our heart," Trump said. "We'll try and do something in a bipartisan way. Otherwise, we'll be holding it for a little bit later."

    Republicans are eager to build on the victory achieved late last year with the overhaul of the nation's tax code. But before moving on to infrastructure and other items, Trump and his GOP allies first must navigate a tricky landscape of leftover legislation from last year that promises to test party unity in the coming weeks.

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    The need to work with Democrats on a spending package, for instance, is sure to whip up opposition from many conservatives to a hoped-for catchall spending bill slated for next month.

    The Camp David presidential retreat in Maryland's Catoctin Mountains provides a woodsy respite from Washington. It's a place where presidents and lawmakers can bond over meals, hikes and movie nights.

    "There's a feeling here that you don't have in very many places. There was a bonding," Trump said of the visit.

    Trump's chief of staff, John Kelly, told reporters Saturday that lawmakers and top White House officials had enjoyed "a couple of glasses of wine together last night" and gathered with Trump to watch the new movie "The Greatest Showman," starring Hugh Jackman. (He described it as "very, very entertaining.")

    Politics, too, were on the agenda, with talks about the midterm elections. Republicans are at risk of losing the majority they've held in the House since 2011, and could also lose seats in the Senate, though many more Democratic incumbents are up for re-election this year.

    Trump's former chief strategist, Steve Bannon, became a self-styled leader of an insurgency against Republican incumbents, arguing that Trump's agenda could only be passed with an influx of outsiders. But Bannon is on the outs with Trump and the president's comments Saturday suggested he's washing his hands of any such uprising. Trump said he needs more Republicans in Congress.

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    Associated Press writers Andrew Taylor in Washington and Rebecca Santana in New Orleans contributed to this report.