Trump Campaign Hasn't Committed to Staying Away From Hacked Material - NBC 6 South Florida
Decision 2020

Decision 2020

The latest news on the race for president in 2020

Trump Campaign Hasn't Committed to Staying Away From Hacked Material

Trump’s personal attorney Rudy Giuliani recently maintained that there was “nothing wrong with taking information from Russians”

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    In this file photo, President Donald Trump speaks to the "Rx Drug Abuse and Heroin Summit," Wednesday, April 24, 2019, in Atlanta.

    President Donald Trump’s re-election campaign has not publicly stated that it will not use hacked materials to its advantage, in contrast with the Democratic National Committee and a long list of the party's 2020 candidates, NBC News reported

    Special counsel Robert Mueller's report said that while investigators had found no criminal conspiracy between the campaign and the Russians, the Trump team expected to "benefit electorally from information stolen and released through Russian efforts." 

    The White House, Trump's 2020 campaign and the Republican National Committee have not responded to requests for comment about future use of hacked materials. Vice President Mike Pence did not directly respond to a question from NBC News Wednesday about whether he regretted the campaign’s use of hacked emails in 2016 and whether he would pledge not to do so again. 

    Notably, Trump’s personal attorney Rudy Giuliani recently maintained that there was “nothing wrong with taking information from Russians.”

    Watch: Ta-Nehisi Coates’ Full Opening Statement at House Hearing on Reparations

    [NATL] Watch: Ta-Nehisi Coates’ Full Opening Statement at House Hearing on Reparations

    Ta-Nehisi Coates, author of “The Case for Reparations,” testified before a House Judiciary subcommittee during a hearing on whether the United States should consider compensation for the descendants of slaves. 

    He delivered a rebuttal to Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell's comments that "no one currently alive was responsible for that," which Coates called a "strange theory of governance." 

    "Well into this century the United States was still paying out pensions to the heirs of civil war soldiers," he said. "We honor treaties that date back some 200 years despite no one being alive who signed those treaties. Many of us would love to be taxed for the things we are solely and individually responsible for. But we are American citizens and this bound to a collective enterprise that extends beyond our individual and personal reach."

    (Published Wednesday, June 19, 2019)