NASA Launches Advanced Weather Satellite for Western US

This undated photo provided by the United Launch Alliance via NASA shows a United Launch Alliance Atlas V rocket carrying NOAA's GOES-S satellite waits for liftoff on Thursday, March 1, 2018, from Space Launch Complex 41 at Cape Canaveral Air Force Station in Florida. GOES-S is the second satellite in an approximately $11 billion effort that’s already revolutionizing forecasting with astonishingly fast, crisp images of hurricanes, wildfires, floods, mudslides and other natural calamities. AP/United Launch Alliance/NASA

NASA has launched another of the world's most advanced weather satellites, this time to safeguard the western U.S.

An Atlas V (five) rocket blasted off Thursday from Cape Canaveral, Florida, carrying the GOES-S satellite for the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration. It's the second satellite in an $11 billion effort that's already revolutionizing forecasting with fast, crisp images of hurricanes, wildfires and other natural calamities.

The Jan. 31 “Blue Blood Supermoon” will be a rare “lunar trifecta,” NASA says. Find out why it’s so special and how you can catch a glimpse of it.

(Published Tuesday, Jan. 23, 2018)

The first spacecraft in the series has been monitoring the Atlantic and East Coast for the past year. The same first-class service is now coming to the Pacific region.

It's the third weather tracker launched by NASA in just over a year: "three brilliant eyes in the sky," as NOAA puts it.