Museum to Discuss Efforts to See If Bones Belong to Pirate

In this Wednesday, Sept. 21, 2016, file photo, archaeologist Marie Kesten Zahn, of Yarmouth, Mass., works to remove silver coins from a concretion recovered from the wreckage of the pirate ship Whydah Gally at the Whydah Pirate Museum, in Yarmouth. The undersea explorer Barry Clifford, who discovered the Whydah Gally, the first authenticated pirate shipwreck in U.S. waters, says he’s finally found where the ship’s vaunted treasure lies after more than 30 years of poking around the murky waters off Cape Cod. The concretion is the dense mass of mineral particles formed over time in the ocean between the metallic coins. Steven Senne/AP

Researchers are set to discuss their efforts to determine whether human bones recovered from a Cape Cod shipwreck are those of the infamous pirate Samuel "Black Sam" Bellamy.

The Whydah Pirate Museum in Yarmouth, Massachusetts, says it also will publicly display the bones for the first time and showcase what they believe to be Bellamy's pistol Monday.

Bill Cosby arrived at the Montgomery County Courthouse early Monday, where a judge will decide if the 81-year-old comedian will go to prison as a result of his sexual assault conviction.

(Published Monday, Sept. 24, 2018)

The objects were encased in a hardened mass of sand and stone pulled from the Whydah Gally shipwreck several years ago.

The museum has enlisted forensic scientists to compare DNA from the bones to a sample given by one of Bellamy's living descendants.

The Whydah went down in stormy seas in 1717, killing most of its crew and leaving its treasure on the ocean floor. The wreck was discovered in 1984.

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