After Christmas Delays, UPS Store Staffer Warns Customers Online Shopping Can Be a Gamble

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    NEWSLETTERS

    At the Northwest 67th Avenue UPS Store, staffers were calling customers to verify that their packages had been delivered safely. Doris Mundarray had a warning for customers, NBC 6's Justin Finch reports.

    On the day after Christmas, customers from coast to coast were still waiting for UPS and FedEx to deliver their packages.

    Meantime, at the Northwest 67th Avenue UPS Store, staffers were calling customers to verify that their packages had been delivered safely.

    "I always tell my customer, 'If you want to receive your gift on time, please do it early. Don't wait until the last minute. Don't wait until the last minute,'" explained Doris Mundarray.

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    Mundarray stands by her advice, but also sympathizes with customers who are now left waiting. Despite the lure of overnight shipping, Mundarray said it's best to err on the side of caution when choosing your shipping. That sometimes means understanding overnight delivery could take longer than expected.

    FedEx and UPS have pointed to this year's high volume and a rash of bad weather for its delivery delays for the 2013 holiday. To make up for the lost time, South Florida FedEx and UPS workers were up early to start deliveries, despite heavy rain, to customers who have been sounding off about the late service.

    On the NBC 6 South Florida Facebook page, one customer said her husband spent part of Christmas Day describing the gifts he got her, while their son's present is more than 1,000 miles away in Minnesota.

    Another viewer said her husband is a FedEx employee, and that he worked through Christmas, just so others get their gifts as soon as possible.

    FedEx and UPS have issued explanations. In a statement, UPS said "the volume of air packages in [its] system exceeded the capacity of [its] network. We apologize." FedEx followed suit, and added that the holiday high volume was an "extraordinary event."