Artichoked: Doctor Sues Restaurant Over Thorny Vegetable - NBC 6 South Florida

Artichoked: Doctor Sues Restaurant Over Thorny Vegetable

Doctor claims restaurant is responsible for telling customers how to eat

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    Artichoked: Doctor Sues Restaurant Over Thorny Vegetable

    If you are what you eat, chances are Arturo Carvajal isn't a thorny vegetable capable of ripping up a person's intestines.

    The Miami doctor is suing a local restaurant after he knowingly ate an entire artichoke, thorny leaves and all, and then experienced excruciating pain afterward.

    The lawsuit, filed against Houston's in Aventura, essentially claims the restaurant was responsible for Carvajal's pain because employees didn't tell the man that he was supposed to eat the soft meat located on the inside of the artichoke, not the entire thing.

    That's about as bad as suing over hot coffee, but then again, that cost a certain chain millions in damages.

    According to the lawsuit, a server suggested the grilled artichoke to Carvajal, who responded he had never seen or even heard of an artichoke, but decided to order it anyway. At no point, the lawsuit states, did the waiter tell Carvajal how to eat the dish.

    We also assume, the waiter didn't show him how to use a fork or spoon either, but we digress.

    After devouring the artichoke, Carvajal experienced severe abdominal pain and had to go to the hospital. Doctors found artichoke leaves lodged in his small bowel and had to perform surgery to remove them.

    "Arturo Carvajal suffered bodily injury, resulting in pain and suffering, disability, disfigurement, mental anguish, loss of capacity for the enjoyment of life..." states the lawsuit.

    The food ignorant doctor is looking for at least $15,000 in damages.

    “It's just kind of a silly notion” Glenn Viers, attorney for the restaurant chain, told Business Insurance. "What's next? Are we going to have to post warnings on our menu they shouldn't eat the bones in our barbecue ribs?”

    Be careful, Viers. You don't want to start giving customers any ideas.