Vikings

In Tree Rings and Radioactive Carbon, Signs of the Vikings in North America

Wood at a settlement in Canada's Newfoundland that was cut with metal tools helped researchers pinpoint when the Norse first reached the continent — well before Columbus

Canada, Newfoundland, L'anse Aux Meadows Nhp, Replicas Of
Wolfgang Kaehler/LightRocket via Getty Images

Vikings from Greenland — the first Europeans to arrive in the Americas — lived in a village in Canada’s Newfoundland exactly 1,000 years ago, according to research published Wednesday.

Scientists have known for many years that Vikings — a name given to the Norse by the English they raided — built a village at L’Anse aux Meadows in Newfoundland around the turn of the millennium. But a study published in Nature is the first to pinpoint the date of the Norse occupation.

The explorers — up to 100 people, both women and men — felled trees to build the village and to repair their ships, and the new study fixes a date they were there by showing they cut down at least three trees in the year 1021 — at least 470 years before Christopher Columbus reached the Bahamas in 1492.

“This is the first time the date has been scientifically established,” said archaeologist Margot Kuitems, a researcher at the University of Groningen in the Netherlands and the study’s lead author.

“Previously the date was based only on sagas — oral histories that were only written down in the 13th century, at least 200 years after the events they described took place,” she said.

Read the full story on NBCNews.com

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