Everything you need to know for the 2014 hurricane season

Hurricane Center Looks To Create Longer Range Forecasts

Hurricane season starts June 1 and runs until Nov. 30

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    NEWSLETTERS

    TK
    ASSOCIATED PRESS
    This satellite image provided by NOAA and taken Tuesday, Aug. 30, 2011, shows Tropical Storm Katia. Hurricane Katia is continuing its trek across the Atlantic Thursday, Sept. 1, 2011, with little change in strength. The U.S. National Hurricane Center in Miami says some strengthening is expected and Katia could become a major hurricane by the weekend.(AP Photo/NOAA)

    As part of efforts to give improved forecasts, the National Hurricane Center will create six-and seven-day forecasts to track storms this hurricane season, but the project will be kept secret.

    The forecasts will be part of four experiments to be carried out by the center for this season, the South Florida Sun Sentinel reported.

    Last year's longer forecast experiment was leaked to the public and was stopped.

    "We weren't able to button them up; people were finding out," said James Franklin, a hurricane specialist.

    This year, experts will experiment with extended tropical weather outlooks, creating advisories for disturbances before they classified as tropical storms, and issuing watches and warnings when disturbances are threatening land masses.

    In an effort to get better intensity forecasts, a computer model will get information from a Doppler radar coming from a hurricane hunter plane when it flies into the storms.

    “There’s a fair amount of evidence that Doppler data in high resolution models can improve intensity forecasts,” Franklin was quoted as saying by the newspaper. “That’s exciting.”

    Hurricane season starts June 1 and runs until Nov. 30.

    Click here for the NBC 6 Interactive Radar and here for forecasts.