Changing Lives: 7th Grader Gives Gift of Mobility to Children Around the World - NBC 6 South Florida

Changing Lives: 7th Grader Gives Gift of Mobility to Children Around the World

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    NEWSLETTERS

    Student, Teacher Build Prosthetic Hands for Kids

    A student and teacher at Gulliver Academy partnered up to 3D print prosthetic hands for kids around the world. NBC 6's Marissa Bagg reports.

    (Published Monday, June 10, 2019)

    What to Know

    • Orozco’s students have learned that their work in the classroom can have lasting effects today and on tomorrow

    • The bond between a Gulliver Academy teacher and student can break barriers and in this student’s case, change lives.

    The bond between a Gulliver Academy teacher and student can break barriers and in this student's case, change lives.

    Christopher Korn, a seventh-grader at Gulliver Academy, learned to use 3D-printing technologies to develop prosthetic limbs for people who cannot afford them.

    Korn and his teacher, Willy Orozco, have worked together to use the school's 3D printers to help others. He has traveled to Bolivia twice already to deliver these prosthetics. He is preparing for his third upcoming trip.

    "My family is from there and since we have so many people underprivileged and don't have the opportunity to get a prosthetic, I feel like that's a good place," Korn said.

    Orozco started making 3D prosthetics two years ago. When he realized where this could go, he recruited the help of his students.

    People overseas who need the limbs reach out to Korn and Orozco through social media, then send in their measurements so the students can adjust the pieces for each person.

    "We just give this for free to the recipients, they don't need to pay for them, it's about my students learning and being able to help others," Orozco said.

    They do.

    Korn's relationship to Bolivia has strengthened his desire to keep working on this project.

    "It takes a lot of patient effort, it really does," Korn said. "Some parts don't go [together easily], but you can get the job done if you're dedicated and devoted to what you're doing."

    Two children, a six-year-old boy in Bolivia and a five-year-old girl in England, were given the ability to enjoy life with these brand-new prosthetic hands.

    Orozco's students have learned that their work in the classroom can have lasting effects today and on tomorrow.

    "We are trying to build a sense of community and how middle school kids can realize they can change someone's life," Orozco said.

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