Department of Children and Families Asks the Public to Sign Up For Disaster Alerts

Residents can receive text and email alerts to find out whether their area is eligible to receive electronic food stamp cards

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    NEWSLETTERS

    Residents in Marathon prepared for Isaac as they would any other big storm, and dozens of shops were shuttered on the city's Overseas Highway. But in the end what they got was just a wet and very windy weekend. "There's no such thing as a small storm, big storm. Every storm poses some sort of a danger," Monroe County Emergency Management Director Irene Toner said. "So to think, 'Oh, it's only Cat 1,' or 'It's only a tropical storm' is really not the way to look at it, because Mother Nature is unpredictable - as the storm turned out to be unpredictable." Nashville native Michael Hall took refuge from the storm at a shelter. (Published Sunday, Aug 26, 2012)

    State officials have set up a text alert system in case residents need assistance after Tropical Storm Isaac.

    The Department of Children and Families may provide emergency food assistance to some areas after the storm passes. Residents can receive text and email alerts to find out whether their area is eligible to receive electronic food stamp cards. Families who receive food stamps may also receive replacement benefits for any food lost because of home damage or prolonged power outages.

    Lots of Rain, But Small Pockets of Flooding in Homestead

    [MI] Lots of Rain, But Small Pockets of Flooding in Homestead
    Homestead received more than 7 inches of rain from Tropical Storm Isaac. But overall there was only small pockets of flooding, in places where it was expected because of poor drainage. Homestead Mayor Steven Bateman said the city fared well during Isaac. (Published Sunday, Aug 26, 2012)

    Heavy Rains From Isaac Cause Flooding in South Florida

    The "Food for Florida" disaster relief program provides emergency food assistance after hurricanes and other disasters under the U.S. Department of Agriculture.

    Florida distributed $270 million in emergency aid to more than 2 million people after Hurricane Wilma in 2005.

    South Florida Flooding Photos