Key Witness James "Pudgy" Fiorillo Testifies in Gus Boulis Murder Case

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    NEWSLETTERS

    James “Pudgy” Fiorillo could have been sitting where Anthony “Big Tony” Moscatiello and Anthony “Little Tony” Ferrari were Tuesday – charged with orchestrating the 2001 murder of Gus Boulis. NBC 6's Christina Hernandez reports. (Published Tuesday, Oct 8, 2013)

    James “Pudgy” Fiorillo could have been sitting where Anthony “Big Tony” Moscatiello and Anthony “Little Tony” Ferrari were Tuesday – charged with orchestrating the 2001 murder of Gus Boulis.

    Instead, Fiorillo was on the stand, testifying against the two men who are charged with first-degree murder in the mob-style slaying of Boulis, the founder of Miami Subs and SunCruz Casinos.

    Boulis Murder Trial Continued Saturday in Fla.

    [MI] Boulis Murder Trial Continued Saturday in Fla.
    Testimony continued Saturday in the murder trial of two men accused of setting up the 2001 ambush slaying of South Florida businessman Konstantinos "Gus" Boulis. NBC 6's Claudia DoCampo reports. (Published Saturday, Oct 5, 2013)

    Fiorillo pleaded guilty last year to conspiracy to commit murder in Boulis’ death. As part of his plea deal with prosecutors, Fiorillo agreed to testify against Moscatiello, 75, and Ferrari, 56, who have pleaded not guilty.

    Fiorillo said Ferrari has threatened his life before.

    Gus Boulis Murder Trial Begins

    [MI] Gus Boulis Murder Trial Begins
    Prosecutor Greg Rossman recounted the moments when Miami Subs founder and casino operator Konstantinos "Gus" Boulis was ambushed as the trial of two men charged in his 2001 murder finally began Monday. Anthony "Big Tony" Moscatiello, 75, and Anthony "Little Tony" Ferrari, 56, face first-degree murder charges in the death of Boulis and have pleaded not guilty. Ferrari's defense attorney, Chris Grillo, fired back at Rossman's opening statement as he delivered his own. (Published Monday, Sep 30, 2013)

    “And he tells me, you know, ‘I should put a bullet in your F-ing head,’” Fiorillo said.

    Boulis was killed after leaving his office, driving his car in Fort Lauderdale. Fiorillo told jurors about the plan to block Boulis in the car, so he wouldn't be able to drive away when a gunman opened fire. But Fiorillo wasn't there for that.

    He says he was driving to Ferrari's house when the shooting took place. Then, the murder of Boulis made the news.

    "There was a news story about a fellow that crashed into a pole or tree,” Fiorillo said.

    “He was sitting in front of the TV, I was behind him, kind of turned around and said that was our boy, the one we were looking for,” Fiorillo recalled about Ferrari. “The comment I remember was is it seems like our boy had an accident."

    Then, Fiorillo said, he got rid of the murder weapon at Ferrari's request.

    "He was handing me the bag that had the gun in it. Before we got there, he said just to get rid of it,” Fiorillo said.

    He did as he was going over a bridge, Fiorillo said.

    “Pulled off to the side and just threw it in there as far and as deep as I could,” he said.

    Fiorillo said Moscatiello told him to disappear for 18 years.

    His plea deal included a six-year prison sentence, which he has already served.

    Fiorillo is expected to be back on the stand Wednesday.