Education Nation

Education Nation

A solutions-focused conversation about the state of education in America

"Box Tops" Being Sold Online

One eBay user is selling 1,000 of the cardboard cutouts, which students collect to win prizes and fundraise, for $120

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    NEWSLETTERS

    Some people are buying and selling the cardboard cutouts from Box Tops for Education online. Alex Heller, 7, and his mother Hari spoke about box tops. Hari Heller isn’t interested in buying box tops online, but believes in free enterprise.

    If you have a child in school, there's a good chance you've heard of Box Tops for Education.

    The logos can be found on the corners of hundreds of products in grocery stores. Students collect the cardboard cutouts to win prizes and raise money for their school.

    But these days, some people aren't buying actual products at the market – they're buying and selling the cardboard cutouts in another kind of marketplace.

    One eBay user is selling 1,000 for $120. You also can bid on 500 for $45 from seller melziemelzie911.

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    A basic search for box tops returns hundreds of results.

    On a private Facebook group page called "Mama Market," one user is selling 90 for $10.

    These kinds of posts have generated responses that consider the act unethical.

    It's against the General Mills program's policy to buy or sell box tops.

    The race to collect them certainly drives competition among classmates. Just ask Hari Heller's 7-year-old son Alex, who attends Sheridan Park Elementary School in Hollywood.

    "Box tops are really cool because they help our schools,” he said. “The person that has the most box tops gets a pizza party.”

    Alex's mother says her kids know which items to get at the grocery store.

    "It's an incentive for the kids to bring them in, and since I have three children, I have to divide them equally every month, or there's a fight," she said.

    Heller isn't interested in buying box tops online, but believes in free enterprise. She believes that as long as the cash goes toward education, it's a good thing.

    "If people really want to buy them online and bring them to their school, and the school gets a dime for each one, the school needs it," she said.

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