'Dogs on the Move' Takes Canines With Skin Conditions to No-Kill Shelters on East Coast

The move will ease overcrowding at Miami-Dade shelters and save these dogs from euthanasia.

By Julia Bagg
|  Friday, Aug 23, 2013  |  Updated 11:33 AM EDT
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Miami-Dade's 'Dogs on the Move' will relocate 22 canines, who all suffer from skin conditions, to various no-kill shelters along the East Coast. NBC 6's Julia Bagg has the story.

Miami-Dade's 'Dogs on the Move' will relocate 22 canines, who all suffer from skin conditions, to various no-kill shelters along the East Coast. NBC 6's Julia Bagg has the story.

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At least 24 lucky dogs are getting a new leash on life Friday, and it's all starting with a cross-country road trip.

Miami-Dade's 'Dogs on the Move' will relocate the pups, who all suffer from skin conditions, to various no-kill shelters along the East Coast.

The dogs, previously housed at Comfort Kennels in Hialeah, were loaded in a van at 7:30 a.m. for the trip. They'll be stopping at shelters in South Carolina, New Jersey, Long Island, Massachusetts and New Hampshire.

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"We constantly have the need to find creative ways to get new homes for our pets," said Melissa Sorokin with Miami-Dade Animal Services. "Especially summer time is the high season of people dropping pets and bringing pets to animal services, so the transport program is one innovative way to give them great lives."

Sorokin said the dogs being transported Friday all suffer from Demodex Mange, a skin condition involving parasites. The relocation will ease overcrowding for Animal Services, who receives over 30,000 pets per year, and save dogs like these from euthanasia.

"We're really excited that they're going to get all the care that they need," Sorokin said.

Stay with NBC6.com and NBC 6 South Florida for updates on the dogs' journey.

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